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ELECTRONIC 
NEWS BULLETIN
FOR THE
 

ADUR VALLEY


 
 News & Events
 Wildlife Reports
 Words of the Week
 Historical Snippet
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If you wish to receive this Bulletin, please ask by EMail, specifying the Adur Torpedo with your full name.
 Glaucus@hotmail.com
 Web Sites (Local)
 Poem
 Computer Tips
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 Web Sites (****)
 Events
 Adur "World Oceans Day"
 SLIDE SHOW  2000

 
 
LOCAL
ORGANISATIONS
ADUR CANOE CLUB
ALCHEMIST
BRITISH MARINE LIFE STUDY
SOCIETY
FRIENDS OF LANCING RING
MARLIPINS MUSEUM
SHOREHAM AIRPORT SOCIETY
SHOREHAM LIFEBOAT STATION
SHOREHAM ROWING CLUB
SHOREHAM SAILING CLUB
SUSSEX ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
SUSSEX JAPAN SOCIETY
SUSSEX YACHT CLUB

 
LOCAL RESIDENTS PAGE


This is the first published Electronic Newspaper for 
Shoreham-by-Sea and District, West Sussex, England


     2 August 2000 : Volume 2  Issue 28


Local News
2 August 2000
The Adur Valley EForum covering all aspects of life in the Adur Valley commences. You can join by spending a few minutes on the following site, and then you can post messages on almost anything about life in Shoreham-by-sea and the Adur Valley, including, Lancing, Sompting, Southwick, Steyning and the smaller villages in the valley. 

The EForum may appear a slow starter. It is really up to the subscribers to make it a success by sending high quality messages and inviting other people to join. 
 

ADUR VALLEY EFORUM PAGE

30 May 2000
Kingston Beach fails to comply with the mandatory levels of minimum sewage pollution, exceeding the coliform count. This is not the EA figures but samples taken by Adur District Council
EU Legal Requirements (link)



Please send any comments to: Andy Horton
Glaucus@hotmail.com


  • Wildlife Reports

    1 August 2000
    A most unusual appearance on Kingston Beach was a solitary Snakelocks Anemone, which reach their most easterly point of distribution up the English Channel (northern coast) at Worthing, with an occasional stragglers on the shore at Shoreham, and almost entirely absent from Brighton

    31 July 2000
    A Clouded Yellow Butterfly was spotted on a Childing Pink are still in flower in the minute area of sand dunes remaining on Shoreham Beach. These rare plants seem to have increased in number, but are still under threat from encroaching vegetation

    26 July 2000
    A shoal of about 150 adult Grey Mullet, Chelon labrosus, varying in length from 40 cm to 90 cm (excluding the caudal fin) followed the neap tide in in the shallows of the River Adur on the southern side outside Emerald Quay. In between the high density flats, the small weir keeps a depth of water of just under a metre and makes a huge rock pool trapping up to perhaps half a dozen Grey Mullet and shoals of hundreds of small (first year) Bass where they spend the summer. The Bass were "flashing and the inevitable Shore Crabs crawled along the bottom and around the mooring ropes.

    British Naturalists' Association (link)


    Find the Sites of Special Scientific Interest using this link:
    Friends of the Earth SSSI Navigator



    Words of the Week

    cell  (in biology) The structural and functional unit of all living organisms. Cell size varies, but most cells are microscopic (average diameter 0.010.1 mm). Cells may exist as independent units of life, as in bacteria and protozoans, or they may form colonies or tissues, as in all higher plants and animals. Each cell consists of a mass of protein material (see *protoplasm) that is differentiated into a jelly-like substance (see *cytoplasm) and a *nucleus, which contains DNA. The protoplasm is bounded by a *cell membrane, which in plant and bacterial cells is surrounded by a *cell wall. There are two main types of cell. Prokaryotic cells (bacteria) are the more primitive. The nuclear material is not bounded by a membrane and chemicals involved in cell metabolism are associated with the cell membrane. Reproduction is asexual and involves simple cell cleavage. In eukaryotic cells the nucleus is bounded by a nuclear membrane and the cytoplasm is divided by membranes into a system of interconnected cavities and separate compartments (organelles), e.g. *mitochondria, *endoplasmic reticulum, *Golgi apparatus, *lysosomes, and *ribosomes. Reproduction can be either asexual (see *mitosis) or sexual (see *meiosis). Plants and animals consist of eukaryotic cells but plant cells possess *chloroplasts and other *plastids and bear a rigid cellulose cell wall.

    cell body (perikaryon)  The part of a *neurone that contains the nucleus. The cell processes that are involved in the transmission and reception of nervous impulses (the axon and the dendrites respectively) develop as extensions from the cell body.

    cell division  The formation of two daughter cells from a single mother cell. The nucleus divides first and this is followed by the formation of a cell membrane between the daughter nuclei. In *mitosis the daughter nuclei are identical to the original nucleus; *meiosis results in daughter nuclei each with half the number of chromosomes in the mother cell nucleus.

    cell membrane (plasmalemma; plasma membrane)  The semipermeable *membrane forming the outer limit of a *cell. It consists mostly of protein and lipid. The membrane regulates the flow of materials in and out of the cell and plays a role in the production or assembly of the *cell wall or *capsule (when this is present).
     ---------------------------------------------------------

    Excerpted from The Oxford Refrence Shelf, Scientific Dictionary
    Oxford University Press Copyright (c) 1994 


    Computer Tips

    The upsurge of EForums on all subjects (a few have been recommended before in these bulletins) are an important way in which the Internet will change the world. One controversy is the effect of pressure groups and professional media manipulators will move in on this field. Another is the Government's inclination to censor this anarchic media. This is just another subject will doubtless be a matter of heated debate. 

    Smart Groups Forums
     

  • Star:  Latest Virus Information 

  • Poem of the Week

    Here leaps ashore the full sou'west
    All heavy-winged with brine,
    Here lies above the folded crest
    The channel's lifted line;

    And here the sea-fogs lap and cling,
    And here, each warning each,
    The sheep-bells and the ship bells ring
    Along the hidden beach.

    Rudyard Kipling 
    Poem supplied by Ray Hamblett

  •  Sussex Web Sites

  •  Historical Snippets

  •  

     

    ingas:  this is a Saxon place name/word which is generally accepted to mean "groups of people" and was originally thought to be indicative of the early Saxon settlers. However, this theory is not shared by all Saxon historians, presumably because this theory was based on the questionable evidence of the Saxon Chronicle, and they preferred the more reliable evidence of burial finds (from studies in Sussex). They think the suffix  ton  is earlier.
    My tendency is accept that these place names are indicative of early Saxon settlers.
    e.g. Patching, Lancing, Worthing, Goring, Ferring, Angmering, Sompting, Climping#, Tarring, Upper Beeding#, Poling,  Annington (near Botolphs, and originally Anningdun).
    High Salvington, Offington, Torrington, Durrington, Rustington,
    Erringham# (Erringham is just north of Mill Hill),
    are all in the small area (#or just outside) between the rivers Adur (Shoreham) and Arun, formerly Tarrant {Tarente c.725} (Littlehampton).
    Other names in this are of Sussex slightly further afield are:
    Steyning, Fulking, Ditchling, Wappingthorn, Winding,
    West Chiltington, West Blatchington, Storrington, Washington, Aldrington, Ashington.
    Ovingdean, Rottingdean, Woodingdean.
    plus many more (about 19) in Sussex including Birling Gap, West Wittering, Billingshurst, Hastings.
    Other smaller names in Sussex:
    Bidlington, Buddington, Warmingshurst, Atherington, Pallington, Poling, Tottington, Bailinghill.

    Brief History of Shoreham-by-Sea



  • Web Sites
    •  
    WORLDWIDE:  RECOMMENDED SITES: 1 TO 5 STARS

    1 August 2000
    The British Marine Wildlife Forum commences.  PLEASE JOIN
     
     

    BRITISH MARINE WILDLIFE  FORUM PAGE

    Whereas all reports on this news page have to be checked for their authenticity, as far as possible, speculative discoveries like a Dolphin Fish in Plymouth Sound can be entered on the forum, and also discussions, queries, questions etc. 


    *****

    All the fish in the sea, and rivers and lakes, streams of the world. 



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