Adur Valley Wildlife
Butterflies and the Larger Moths 2010 
Link to the Mill Hill web page for 2008All observations by Andy Horton, unless stated otherwise.
It would be tedious to list all sightings on the main pages,  but for flight times purposes the following butterflies and moths include ones not recorded on the main Nature Notes pages:

BUTTERFLY LISTS
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009


Sussex Butterfly Reports (Butterfly Conservation Society)
UK Butterflies: Sightings
Adur Moths
Adur Butterfly Flight Times
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Adur Skippers
Adur Nature 2010

  British Lepidoptera on  flickr

WILDLIFE REPORTS
(Narrative):
 

Butterfly List 2011
 

19 November 2010
On the cleared scrub area on the lower slopes of Mill Hill (north of the path) an almost intact Peacock Butterfly basked on the dewy large leaves of a Great Mullein plant.

5 November 2010
A Red Admiral made a brief appearance in my garden on Shoreham Beach.

Report by Jennie Tindale on facebook


24 October 2010
After a spell of inclement weather I did not expect any butterflies in the brief interlude of sunshine, but there was at least one Speckled Wood on the Nettles over the Waterworks Road, Old Shoreham. On the lower slopes of Mill Hill, I saw a large butterfly amongst the Clematis in the distance but it disappeared before I could recognise the species (it was probably a Red Admiral). A small female Common Blue fluttered out of the Privet. It had distinct orange spots and could have been mistaken for a Brown Argus.

22 October 2010
A Red Admiral Butterfly rose from a flower in the tiny front garden of 25 West Street, Shoreham.

20 October 2010
The clear skies invited a morning trip to Mill Hill. I was surprised to see so many species of butterflies out: Meadow Browns, male and female Common Blues, Red Admirals, a Speckled Wood, a Small White, Small Coppers and a Large White.

Common Blues

Report & Photographs by Colin Knight
Postcards from Sussex (Blogspot)


11 October 2010
A Red Admiral Butterfly visited a grass verge by Middle Road in Shoreham.

10 October 2010
At least eight (possibly nine, ten or eleven) species of butterfly were seen on a sunny day with the first one of two Large Whites at the top of Buckingham Park and the second a Comma Butterfly rising from the Brambles next to the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting and the last a Large White over the Dovecote Estate, north Shoreham. The linear copse to the east of Buckingham Cutting sheltered two Speckled Woods and another one was seen by the Ivy on the Pixie Path which was also paid a visit by a fast-flying Red Admiral and a possible Holly Blue.
 
Meadow Brown (double-spicked)
Female Common Blue
 

On the lower slopes of Mill Hill the first butterfly to be be seen was a Wall Brown, confirmed when it landed on a Lesser Centaury. There was almost certainly another one over the area north of the path which had been cleared of scrub. At the northern part of the lower slopes there were two female Common Blues, a pristine Meadow Brown, the Small Copper and what was probably a Large White (although it looked like a possible Green-veined White). A large vanessid flew over the lower slopes and I thought it was a Peacock Butterfly, but it was more likely to be a Red Admiral. The scrub hosted a Red Admiral and a Meadow Brown on the Ivy and a Comma nearby. The middle and upper slopes were devoid of butterflies except for another Red Admiral over the road.
Eight definite species

8 October 2010
The first butterfly of the day was a Red Admiral at the top of Buckingham Road in Shoreham. There was a smattering of butterflies over the lower slopes of Mill Hill with the first of eight of Meadow Browns fluttering between the exiguous nectar plants including the common Lesser Centaury and one Greater Knapweed that hosted two butterflies. At the northern end of the lower slopes there was a pristine Small Copper that was spotted visited a Hawkbit before it quickly fluttered away, and an intact female Common Blue with a substantial blue tinge. On the Ivy by the north-western gate a Red Admiral settled briefly. A large brown butterfly flew rapidly over the steeper slopes and I think this must have been a Wall Brown. There were two more Red Admirals over the Pixie Path, the last two seen in the early afternoon.
Mill Hill Report
Five species

7 October 2010
On the patch of grassland north of Brooklands, east Worthing (west of the Lancing border) the wild flower meadow creation contained a few White Campion, a few Corn Cockle, occasional Cornflowers and other meadow plants that attracted a Red Admiral Butterfly and a medium-sized brown moth or butterfly that fluttered away too quickly to be identified.

6 October 2010
Just two butterflies were noted: a Red Admiral over the large garden hedge at the top of the Pixie Path and a tattered male Common Blue Butterfly fluttered around the cow pats (still remaining from the spring) on the upper meadows of Mill Hill.

30 September 2010
A single Red Admiral was spotted perched near the Stinging Nettles on the southern part of the Pixie Path to Mill Hill, with a probable Large White over the north-western corner of Frampton's Field. Over Mill Hill Road where the Ivy hedge borders both sides of the narrow road, a probable Green-Veined White flew over. Because of the damp slippery conditions, I only followed the path and only visited the northern part of the lower slopes of Mill Hill, where there were two Meadow Browns, a blue butterfly visiting Hardheads which was thought to be a Common Blue, (although it could easily have been a damaged Adonis Blue), a Small Heath Butterfly and a Small Copper visiting Hawkbits.
Seven species

26 September 2010
After five days of inclement weather, the cool chill wind from the north gave an autumny feel. Butterflies were discouraged, had died or hibernated, and only on the lower slopes of Mill Hill were any to be seen in flight visiting the few nectar plants available on the downs. Meadow Browns were the only one of the five species to be frequently seen on the lower slopes (the only area visited) with ten seen on the 1.2 transect area, and three more seen on the steeper slopes. There were still two female Adonis Blues, two male Common Blues including one in fine condition as well as a female, two Small Heath Butterflies, and the Small Copper still looking pristine. The male Common Blues were seen visiting Hardheads, Wild Basil and Autumnal Hawkbits.
Five species

20 September 2010
Spider webs had been set to snare unwitting insects, but new butterflies were still emerging if the fresh Green-veined White over the Waterworks Road was an indicator. Red Admirals were frequently seen on the Ivy with at least a dozen on the Pixie Path to Mill Hill, accompanied by scores of hoverflies, flies, spiders and webs and wasps and bees, one Comma Butterfly and one Specked Wood Butterfly and one Green-veined White.
 
Green-veined White
Small Copper

On the lower slopes, I did not walk the transect and did not attempt to count the butterflies, but I noted frequent Adonis Blue of both genders, frequent Meadow Browns, occasional Small Heath Butterflies, occasional Common Blues of both genders, a Small Copper and at least one Treble-bar Moth. In Lancing I noted a Small White Butterfly and Large Whites were seen in Shoreham.
Ten species

19 September 2010
A Force 4 breeze blow from the west in the morning but it died down under the cloudy sky by midday, but most of the butterflies were still resting in the cool conditions. The first flash of orange on the lower slopes of Mill Hill was a Small Heath Butterfly visiting Eyebright. This was interesting because the small Eyebright is not a flower that is visited very often despite the ultra-violet nectar guides to attract pollinating insects. Just one flash of blue was a male Adonis Blue, but there were 18 females on the 1.2 acre transect, some of them visiting diminutive Hardhead flowers. The most impressive sighting was a pristine Small Copper Butterfly which visited Devil's Bit Scabious for a fleeting second. 21 Meadow Browns were counted on the lower slopes and there were more in the scrub. There were at least two more Small Heath Butterflies and two male Common Blues visiting Hawkbits and at least on female seen. On one Ivy bush in the scrub there were two Red Admirals and one Comma Butterfly. The meadows south of the Reservoir contained hundreds of the dead heads of Greater Knapweed and a Treble-bar Moth was seen, but no butterflies as the breeze reached Force 5.
The Pixie Path added just one Red Admiral and a Meadow Brown on the Ivy, and there was a female Chalkhill Blue resting on a Hardhead on the Mill Hill Cutting (SW). The Butterfly Copse next to the Waterworks Road added another Red Admiral.
Seven species

15 September 2010
A flash of orange and then a settled butterfly were two Comma Butterflies the first butterflies of the day seen on the south-north section of the Pixie Path. There were followed by a pair of Speckled Woods and Holly Blue around the Ivy. It was a cool and breezy day, too cool for butterflies and only occasional Adonis Blues and Meadow Browns plus one Small Heath Butterfly were seen on the lower slopes of Mill Hill. A Large White Butterfly flew over Middle Road Allotments, Shoreham.
Seven species

13 September 2010
A Red Admiral Butterfly flew past me as I cycled through residential Shoreham.

12 September 2010
A cloudy day with ample sunshine with occasional butterflies on the outskirts of Shoreham like a Small White by the entrance to the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath, in Old Shoreham Road, a Red Admiral over the Waterworks Road, a few Speckled Woods near the Butterfly Copse at the south-western end of Frampton's Field, Holly Blues on the Ivy of the Pixie Path, and a male Chalkhill Blue seen on a cursory visit to the Mill Hill Cutting (SW). On the lower slopes of Mill Hill, the female Adonis Blues now outnumbered the males with 25 and 36 respectively giving a total of 61 on the 1.2 acre transect with more on the steeper slopes. Almost all the females were in good condition and recognised as definite Adonis Blues. A note was made of their nectar plants and the ones recorded were Clematis, Sweet Violets, Hawkbits, Eyebrights, Devil's Bit Scabious and Carline Thistle. The other butterflies were frequent 40+ Meadow Browns mostly on the lower slopes, frequent 18+ Small Heath Butterflies with a handful including a courting pair on the upper plateau, at least one Large White, and at least one male Common Blue visited a Hardhead on the middle slopes. Near Old Erringham pasture, a Meadow Brown visited a Field Scabious, and on the Triangle area of the middle slopes, a Small Heath* opened its wings for more than a second when it landed on a Ragwort flower. Butterflies were almost entirely absent from the top meadows, apart from a good condition male Adonis Blue that visited a Hardhead before it flew into a spider's web.
(*This butterfly normally only lands with its wings folded.)
Eight species

Adur Violets
 
Clouded Yellow visiting a Sweet Violet
Clouded Yellow and
Meadow Brown
Clouded Yellow and
Musk Thistle

Mill Hill is proving to be a draw for butterfly enthusiasts wanting to photograph the two Clouded Yellows that appeared in the afternoon. I managed some superb photographs as the cloud cover encouraged the butterflies to remain still.

Photographs and Clouded Yellow Report by Colin Knight
Postcards from Sussex (Blogspot)


9 September 2010
Two immigrant Clouded Yellow Butterflies flew rapidly from one end of the lower slopes of Mill Hill to the other and back again. The count of Adonis Blues on the 1.2 acre transect of the lower slopes of Mill Hill was 63 (44 males and 19 females*) with as many Meadow Browns on the lower slopes plus another 20 on the middle slopes, a handful of female Common Blues, one male Chalkhill Blue, frequent Small Heath Butterflies, and a few Large Whites.
 
* Some of the brown females could have been Chalkhill Blues. At least a dozen females were very faded and a light brown, which may very well have been Chalkhill Blues

These photographs show how tricky it is to identify the female blues in the field. The top two are Chalkhill Blues and the bottom two Adonis Blues.

This study of the female Common Blue Butterfly (on the right) shows its unfurled proboscis to feed on nectar of Ploughman's Spikenard on the lower slopes of Mill Hill

     Peacock Butterfly

The Mill Hill Cutting (SW) and Pixie Path hosted three of each gender Chalkhill Blues, two female Common Blues, frequent Holly Blues some pre-mating, and occasional 10+ Meadow Browns. A few Speckled Woods were seen on the Pixie Path and in the scrub on Mill Hill. A Small White was seen by the Buddleia still in flower by the Eastern Avenue railway crossing gates and an intact Peacock Butterfly by the Waterworks Road, Old Shoreham.
Eight species

Mill Hill was alive with butterfly activity. There are still some good Adonis Blues but I concentrated on two male Clouded Yellows that were patrolling the slopes. They met and fought many times, twirling up over the hill. Close ups required a lot of running around the hill in pursuit and hoping the landing lasted more than a few seconds. They seemed to nectar on most of the flowering plants on the hill. A Hedge Rustic Moth, Tholera cespitis, was spotted in the undergrowth.

Clouded Yellow & Moth Report by Colin Knight (Blogspot)
Adur Moths

8 September 2010
I spotted a distinctive flash of orangey-yellow and I watched a Clouded Yellow Butterfly patrolling his territory on the lower slopes of Mill Hill. I was never able to get near enough to spot exactly where he landed, but I had a great view of him flying methodically around his territory looking for a female.

Clouded Yellow Report by Colin Knight (Blogspot)


7 September 2010
On the Bramble hedge rows on the southern side of Buckingham Cutting, just three species of butterfly were occasionally present after the heavy rain of the last three days: Speckled Woods, Large Whites and Holly Blues.
Three species

4 September 2010
An mid-afternoon visit to Mill Hill is rarely as productive for butterflies as the usual late morning trip. Adonis Blues were the most frequently seen species with 64 (40 males 23 females) seen on the 1.2 acre transect in 25 minutes. There were frequent 35+ Meadow Browns and 20+ Small Heath Butterflies and one male Chalkhill Blue on the lower slopes. I returned by the quickest ridge route through the Hawthorn tunnel where the only other butterflies on the ridge edge just north of the Reservoir were a further 17 (11 males and 6 females) Adonis Blues. Many (10+) of the female Adonis Blues had significant wing damage. A Treble Bar Moth fluttered amongst the scrub above the ridge. Other butterflies recorded on the outskirts of Shoreham were Large Whites and Holly Blues with Chalkhill Blues on the Mill Hill Cutting (SW).
Six butterfly species

3 September 2010
There were still frequent butterflies around on the outskirts of Shoreham, chasing the reduction in nectar plants. Notably a dozen Chalkhill Blues and my first Clouded Yellow of the year on were seen on the Mill Hill Cutting (SW). Occasional Meadow Browns, Large Whites, Small Whites and Holly Blues were seen on the Pixie Path and adjoining areas. The Chalkhill Blues were divided equally between males and females and although most were worn there was at least one male and one female in very good condition.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

2 September 2010
A rather uneventful trek to Lancing Ring found the expected butterflies: Large Whites, Small Whites, Holly Blues, Common Blues, Speckled Woods, Meadow Browns, and Small Heath (2), plus a Common Carpet Moth amongst the tall herbs of McIntyre's Field. A pair of Small Whites were observed pre-mating on the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath, Old Shoreham.
Seven butterfly species

1 September 2010
A Red Admiral Butterfly flew straight in off the sea between the beach huts at Lancing Beach Green and a smaller than normal one was seen in a road nearby. Large Whites and Small Whites were seen around Shoreham town.

31 August 2010
On the outskirts of Shoreham there were frequent Holly Blues, one Speckled Wood (Buckingham Park), one Comma Butterfly (Waterworks Road), one Small White and one Red Admiral (Riverbank towpath by the houseboats), a few Common Blues (Old Shoreham Cyclepath), one Small Heath (towpath near Cuckoo's Corner) and Large Whites frequently seen everywhere.
Eight species

30 August 2010
I saw a female Brown Hairstreak on an Eryngium in my garden (close to Mill Hill).

Report by Ellie Blows on Sussex Butterfly Reports

29 August 2010
Butterflies were still in flight and the count of Adonis Blues on the 1.2 acre transect on the lower slopes of Mill Hill was 122.  The count was 108 males and at least 14 females with at least four mating pairs. There more on the other four acres of the lower slopes a few on the middle slopes and occasional males on the top meadows. Other species seen during the morning were frequent Holly Blues and Speckled Woods in the hedgerows (near Buckingham Cutting south and the Pixie Path), frequent 30+ Meadow Browns, 20+ Common Blues and 15+ Small Heath Butterflies plus one Brown Argus on Mill Hill, occasional (at least three males and four females, probably more) Chalkhill Blues on the Mill Hill Cutting (SW) and frequent Large Whites everywhere. A Silver Y Moth was spotted in the roadside meadow on the southern side of Buckingham Cutting. Some of the Holly Blues on the Pixie Path were very small, not much bigger than a Small Blue.
Nine butterfly species

28 August 2010
Large Whites, a few Small Whites and Red Admirals were seen around the outskirts of Shoreham, plus a small brown butterfly or moth (Gatekeeper size).

24 August 2010
Buffeted about in a Force 6 Strong Breeze gusting to Gale Force 8, the conditions were far from ideal for butterflies after the recent rain. Common Blues, Speckled Woods and Holly Blues were all frequently seen on the southern bank of Buckingham Cutting and nearby Brambles. A Small Tortoiseshell visited Hawkbits on the meadow area. A few Large Whites were also present and frequently seen in Shoreham town.
On the south-western part of the Mill Hill Cutting, (in an area of about ten square metres), I spotted at least eight pristine male Chalkhill Blues all at the same time and at least six worn smaller females crawling over the small area of Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa. A Treble-bar Moth flitted amongst the Cotoneaster. On the Pixie Path, at least three separate pairs of Holly Blues were chasing each other and attempting to mate. A handful of Meadow Browns were in an amorous mood as well. Then a large brown butterfly was spotted with I have identified as a pristine condition female Chalkhill Blue and substantially larger and finer specimen than all those on the Mill Hill Cutting nearby. There was also one very faded and tattered Gatekeeper in close proximity. In the garden hedgerow at the top of the path, I noted a Yellow Shell Moth.
 

Holly Blue
Adonis Blues  & Meadow Browns
Adonis Blues

A gust nearly blew me off my feet on Mill Hill where a few Small Heath Butterflies and Common Blues showed. On the lower slopes male Adonis Blues were immediately noted and Meadow Browns shortly afterwards. The final counts of male Adonis Blues in the 1.2 acre transect was 68 males and 7 females (two positively identified as Adonis). They were attracted to Carline Thistle which seemed more fewer in number than in previous years. Generally, the Adonis Blues tended to be separate from just six male Chalkhill Blues. In contrast Meadow Browns were more than I had seen this year with an estimated 50 on the lower slopes and at least 25 more in the scrub and middle slopes where a further five male Adonis Blues were noted. There seemed to be slightly more (3-2 ratio) Meadow Brown males than females and many were courting. There were at least a dozen Small Heaths on the lower slopes and more on the middle slopes. The small Bordered Straw Moth, Heliothis peltigera, flitted amongst the undergrowth on the lower slopes with one positively identified. There was at least one Small White noted, at least two Holly Blues amongst the northern hedge and two worn Gatekeepers.  A Red Admiral Butterfly was seen at the top of Chanctonbury Drive, south-east of Mill Hill bridge.
Twelve butterfly species

21-22 August 2010
Rain and cloudy weather conditions over the two days of the Shoreham Air Show was unusual and may have put a dampener on the butterflies for the rest of the year.

19 August 2010
After the overnight rain shower, I made an extended visit to the Slonk Hill Cutting area from the eastern end visiting the open meadows first where there were three Common Blue females (originally thought to be Brown Argus, around midday) in the most easterly meadow, followed by the first of the frequent Large White Butterflies in the central meadow on the southern bank with a Meadow Brown or two. Holly Blue Butterflies (50+) were frequently seen amongst the Brambles but none of the them opened their wings on a cloudy day. Almost as frequent were Speckled Woods (35+) which landed and opened their wings readily but none of them were seen mating. The southern bank of Buckingham Cutting hosted a few Small White Butterflies, a few Common Blues including a blue female, a Silver Y Moth, and as I was about to leave I spotted a good condition female Gatekeeper.
Just before Shoreham Library closed (now at 6:00 pm) a Red Admiral rose from the steps on the eastern side.
Eight species

18 August 2010
Out on a hedgerow foraging trip for blackberries, elderberries, plums and apples on the Shoreham outskirts, I still kept my eye open for the butterflies and I wondered if the Gatekeepers were still around. No, not in the Brambles scrub of the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting, north Shoreham, the suspect turned out to be my first confirmed Brown Hairstreak in Shoreham, (TQ 219 065), which has made me more confident about my two previous sightings on Mill Hill. It was a male in an area where Blackthorn bushes were not known but it is so overgrown that they may occur. It was first seen with its wings opened but they were quickly closed and after about a minute the butterfly disappeared into the bushes and was not seen again. I have identified this butterfly as a female.
The Brown Hairstreak is a very secretive butterfly.
 

Holly Blue
Brown Hairstreak (female)
Speckled Woods

Other butterflies on the outskirts of Shoreham were frequent Holly Blues, male Common Blues and Large Whites, 21 Chalkhill Blues (12 males and 8 females on Mill Hill Cutting SW with one pair mating, but most of the females crawling around the leaves of Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa) occasional Speckled Woods, Small Whites and Meadow Browns and one female Common Blue. A couple of Speckled Woods were seen attempting to mate (on the bush next to the Brown Hairstreak) and I think this may also be a first time I have seen this. On the Pixie Path where there was a male Chalkhill Blue and Common Blues.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Eight species

16 August 2010
Around Shoreham town there were a two Red Admirals (not seen on the previous day), occasional Large Whites and a few Holly Blues.

15 August 2010
Despite the cloudy autumnal weather conditions, the blue butterflies were out and about with over fifty Holly Blues on the outskirts of Shoreham and over a hundred each of Chalkhill Blues, Adonis Blues and Common Blues on Mill Hill.
About 15 Holly Blues were around the bushes at the top of Chanctonbury Drive, (SE of Mill Hill Bridge) but just about anywhere there was a hedgerow in town and on the outskirts a Holly Blue would flutter around but they would very rarely settle with their wings open. The 1.2 transect on the lower slopes of Mill Hill was timed at 30 minutes because I stopped to take photographs and on a few occasions the blues were too numerous to count exactly but the total was a minimum of 39 male Chalkhill Blues and 73 Adonis Blues, including at least five females, and an estimated 30 Common Blues, including occasional females. A pair of Adonis Blues were mating. Over half of the butterflies were resting and many of the Adonis Blues were spotted resting in depressions amongst the herbs. A dozen Adonis Blues visited some dung in the frame of a close-up photograph. After counting I stopped to rest and many more of all species appeared. The blue butterflies were all over the steeper slopes and the total numbers were at least three times the numbers counted and probably many more than that.
 

Adonis Blues
Adonis Blues (mating)
Chalkhill Blues (about to mate)

Meadow Browns and Gatekeepers were still frequently seen and there were two Small Heaths on the lower slopes (and half a dozen more on the upper plateau), with six Wall Browns on the lower slopes (and at least five more on the middle slopes and two on the Pixie Path). Common Blues were seen all over Mill Hill, with 30+ in the middle slopes (Triangle area) but the top meadows were not very well populated with just 20, but there were another 50 seen including 20 seen south of the Reservoir, many resting in the long grasses which probably had hidden many more. Other butterflies present were frequent Large Whites, a few Speckled Woods in the Mill Hill scrub, a Brown Argus definitely identified although female Common Blues were most likely. There was a possible Brown Hairstreak south of the upper car park which flew rapidly into the scrub. There were faded pyralid moths Pyrausta nigrata on the lower slopes and middle slopes.
On the south-western part of Mill Hill Cutting, the Chalkhill Blues were courting and mating with at least a dozen males and five females. The Pixie Path hosted occasional Gatekeepers, a Speckled Wood, Holly Blues and a Small White.
Twelve species

14 August 2010
All change for a damp autumn with very few butterflies on the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath, Old Shoreham, one Holly Blue and a few Large Whites and Small Whites were noted in passing.

12 August 2010
A Large White Butterfly fluttered around the Sea Kale and a Common Blue Butterfly landed on the pebbles (illustrated below) by the Old Fort, Shoreham Beach. The Common Blue Butterfly seen and shown in the photograph above may be the variety/abberration Polyommatus icarus ab. arcuata. A vanessid butterfly took to flight before I stepped on it. It flew away too quickly to identify. Other butterflies seen on the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath, Old Shoreham, were one Speckled Wood, two Red Admirals, a few Holly Blues, frequent Small Whites, more Large Whites and Common Blues with at least two Meadow Browns.
Seven confirmed species
 

Adonis Blue
 Chalkhill Blue
Common Blue Butterfly
 Holly Blue

9 August 2010
Sometimes a cloudy overcast day is good for photographing butterflies as they may remain still for just that fraction longer. On the lower slopes of Mill Hill, Carline Thistle now provided a nectar source for some of the 68 male Chalkhill Blues recorded in the 1.2  acre transect in 25 minutes. This total included some (20%) fresh good condition specimens that would have emerged recently. There was almost as many male Adonis Blues with 53 recorded and some (20%) of these were in a worn condition. One female brown butterfly only of either Chalkhill or Adonis was positively seen. Both of these blue species were frequently seen on three acres of the steeper slopes and the actual number on the hill were at least double the count. Common Blues were slightly less, estimated at 30+. At one time the butterflies were all intermingling with each other it was almost impossible to count them. On the lower slopes, both Small Heath Butterflies and Meadow Browns were frequently fluttering around with occasional Gatekeepers and Large Whites. A Wall Brown (one of two) visited Stemless Thistle and Hawkbit on the lower slopes.
 

Common Blue (female)
Chalkhill Blue on
 Carline Thistle
Chalkhill Blue & Adonis Blue

In the scrub, middle slopes and top meadow and plateau there were a further ten Wall Browns making a total of twelve. In the top meadow a Wall Brown visited Greater Knapweed and Lesser Knapweed (Hardhead). In the Marjoram meadow area north of the Triangle area of the middle slopes Common Blues and Brown Argus were frequently seen with a few small pyralid moths Pyrausta purpuralis. There was a Holly Blue in the scrub with at least three Speckled Woods.
The half acre top meadow (north of the upper car park) on Mill Hill was still alive with butterflies, but the half acre now hosted only about a 60 Common Blues on both genders, but the total actually seen on Mill Hill exceeded 200. The meadow areas near the upper car park also hosted at least one Chalkhill Blue, the first Small White Butterfly of a few on the day, and a fresh Peacock Butterfly.
At 6:00 pm on the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting on an overcast evening the Common Blue Butterflies were roosting in the long grasses, but a Green-veined White Butterfly had not yet found a place to rest because the hoverflies including the large Volucella zonaria were still active
Thirteen butterfly species

8 August 2010
A small group enjoyed a most enjoyable and informative walk around the Lancing Ring meadows led by Brianne Reeves. After a rather grey start to the day, (when we began to wonder just how many butterflies we would see), the clouds parted and we were blessed with blue skies, bright sunshine and the warmth that finally encouraged numerous butterflies to emerge from their hiding places. At least fifteen butterfly species were seen including plenty of Common Blues, with Chalkhill Blues, Wall Browns and an unexpected Silver-washed Fritillary. Others spotted were Meadow Brown, Small White, Gatekeeper, Small Skipper, Small Heath, Speckled Wood, Brimstone, Large White, Comma, Red Admiral and Small Tortoiseshell.

Report from Adrienne Stevenson on the Friends of Lancing Ring Blogspot


This was the first time that the Silver-washed Fritillary has been recorded from Lancing Ring Nature Reserve on these Nature Notes pages.
I was unable to make this walk because somebody stole my bicycle

3 August 2010
Another breezy and overcast day with occasional Large Whites and Red Admirals being blown about in Shoreham town.

2 August 2010
With the sun finding a gap in the clouds there were reasonably good conditions for butterfly watching on the parched downs. I was not in the mood for recording the numbers, but I noted that the Chalkhill Blues on the lower slopes of Mill Hill were slightly less than the previous day, but only 64 were recorded in the 20 minutes walk on the 1.2 acre transect, which included just the five definite females including a mating pair that flew away. They may have been more widely dispersed over the slopes. Small Heath Butterflies were frequently seen with the inevitable and frequent Common Blues, Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns. There were almost as many Common Blues as Chalkhill Blues on the lower slopes and at least two male Adonis Blues were spotted with a possible female.
The Scrub area hosted a few Speckled Woods and a Marjoram patch north of the Triangle area of the middle slopes has proved rich in butterflies including hosting three of the fourteen Wall Browns seen on Mill Hill as well as occasional Brown Argus. It was in this area I spotted my first Small Copper on Mill Hill this year. It was in a worn condition. Silver Y Moths and Six-spotted Burnet Moths were noted.
 

Wall Brown
Wall Brown
Small Heath

What a difference a day makes: the half acre top meadow (north of the upper car park) on Mill Hill was still alive with butterflies, but the half acre now hosted only about a 120 Common Blues, but they may have dispersed as surrounding meadow areas were now more densely populated so the total on the hill does not seem to have diminished in numbers. Brown Argus were plentiful as I ever seen them with at least 30 positively recorded and many more did a successful imitation of a Common Blue female.
Brown Argus and female Common Blues ID Images
 
In Shoreham town, Holly Blues, Small Whites and Large Whites were all frequently seen. A Red Admiral visited a garden flower in Nicolson Drive, Shoreham. 

Catmint was very popular with the bumblebees and butterflies with occasional courting pairs of Large Whites and one pair of Common Blues (on Downside) visiting this garden plant. 

Mill Hill Report
Thirteen Butterfly species and two macro-moths

1 August 2010
Another cloudy day and not a day for butterflies to be out, and at first there were very few to be seen and many hoverflies were harassing the ones that had tried to settle in the cool conditions.

Approaches to Mill Hill
The south-western route to Mill Hill starts in Old Shoreham at the Waterworks Road, where the first butterflies were a couple of fresh Large Whites and a Green-veined White. The Pixie Path route added Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns, two of the first of frequent Holly Blues on the day, and a male Common Blue. It was so cloudy over the Mill Hill Cutting it was only because I virtually stepped on them that I disturbed two Chalkhill Blues.

Mill Hill
Even when the sun found a gap in the clouds not many more than a hundred Chalkhill Blues were disturbed on the one acre transect on the lower slopes of Mill Hill. As there was not even spread over the steeper slopes this extrapolated to mere 350 on Mill Hill. This is a very low figure for the peak period. There were a few worn females. The lower slopes hosted about a dozen male Adonis Blues and there was even one seen on a upper meadow. The first butterfly to appear on the lower slopes was a Small Heath one of a few seen with frequent Common Blues, Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns. A small immigrant Bordered Straw Moth, Heliothis peltigera, settled near the Privet. A Wall Brown flew up the hill, but the middle slopes were more a province of this butterfly with six more, another one flying rapidly to and throe' over the top meadow (north of the upper car park) and two more in the meadow south of the Copse.
 

Brown Argus
Chalkhill Blue
Common Blues
Common Blue (female)

The top meadow (north of the upper car park) on Mill Hill, was alive with butterflies and most of these were Common Blues which were everywhere. I estimated the numbers in excess of 700 just in the half acre meadow (north of the upper car park). This extrapolated to over 1500 on Mill Hill, possibly many more. The same meadow hosted a Wall Brown and Adonis Blue already mentioned, frequent Brown Argus as well as the similar female Common Blues, occasional Large Whites and Meadow Browns. The adjoining meadow immediately south of the Copse is now overgrown with Brambles and it was in this area that I saw a dozen or more Brown Argus with some of them about to mate, all mixed with female Common Blues and a few Gatekeepers. A Comma Butterfly landed on a Bramble leaf. A Peacock Butterfly flew over a path. A Holly Blue and Speckled Wood were seen amongst the scrub. A stripy Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar crawled over a Ragwort plant.
 

Adonis Blue
Cinnabar Moth
Caterpillar
Holly Blue
Adonis Blue

In the spinney at the top of The Drive, north Shoreham, a Holly Blue briefly opened its wings, but was chased off by a Speckled Wood. On the southern meadow bank of the Buckingham Cutting  frequent Common Blues of both genders were quickly seen and frequent of the smaller Small Blues were still fluttering around with Large Whites, Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns. I noted at least one 6-spotted Burnet. A Green-veined White fluttered over the Brambles where a handful of Holly Blues were seen. In the linear wood that runs parallel with the A27 dual carriageway, Speckled Woods made a regular appearance with at least six seen and more overlooked. In the clearing at least four Small Whites were identified. On the grass southern bank of the Slonk Hill Cutting, more Brown Argus were courting with two pairs and a few more singles.
Fourteen butterfly species and two macro moths

31 July 2010
A Holly Blue Butterfly visited my front garden in Corbyn Crescent, Shoreham, that was damp after the rain.

30 July 2010
On a cloudy day the first two brown female Chalkhill Blue Butterflies were spotted crawling amongst the leaves of Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, on the south-eastern bank of the Mill Hill Cutting where 25 males flew in this small garden-sized patch, and latterly another two, including a mating pair, were spotted on the transect 1.2 acre of the lower slopes of Mill Hill, where an estimated hundred males were disturbed on a very dull middle of the day.
 

Chalkhill Blue
Holly Blue
Brown Argus
Common Blue (female)

On the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting, the first of the large brown female Common Blues was also recognised.
Brown Argus and female Common Blues ID Images
 
Butterfly  Buckingham Cutting (south) Mill Hill Cutting (south) + Pixie Path Lower slopes of Mill Hill Butterfly Copse and Frampton's Field (south) path  Total
Green-veined White
1
     
1
Speckled Wood
3
 2
   
 5
Large White
4
1
 4
 
 9
Common Blue
E 35
 E 10
 E 35
 
E 80
Small Blue
18
     
18
Brown Argus
3
 3
 
 1
7
Gatekeeper
4
 2
 E 25
 
 E 31
Holly Blue
5
 1
   
6
Chalkhill Blue  
E 25 + 2
E 100 + 2
 
E 125 + 4
Meadow Brown  
2
 E 25
1
E 28
Red Admiral      
2
2
Comma      
 1
1
Small Heath    
 4+
 
4+
Moth          
6-spotted Burnet 
4
 
 E 3
 
E 7
Small Purple-barred  
1
   
1
Shaded Broad-bar
2
     
2
Yellow Shell
 1
     
1

Thirteen butterfly species and four macro-moths

29 July 2010
The day started promising as when I opened my front door in Corbyn Crescent, Shoreham, a Speckled Wood nearly flew in. The emergence of fresh Green-veined White Butterflies on the Adur Levels, notably over thirty seen over the set-aside field west of Ladywells and seen from the Coombes Road, was unprecedented. Over fifty of this white butterfly were seen during the day
Despite the overcast sky, I made a visit to the Lancing Ring Nature Reserve where most of the butterflies were resting and needed to be disturbed to be seen. Two possible Dark Green Fritillaries flew over my head and then lost in the trees of Lancing Clump. If confirmed this would have been the first time I had seen this butterfly. The most prevalent butterflies on a bicycle journey to Lancing Ring were very frequent Gatekeepers (>100) and Meadow Browns (75+). Other noteworthy records were from between four and seven amorous Wall Browns, at least five Chalkhill Blues on the meadows of Lancing Ring, some Large Skippers still around, and the first of the blue female Common Blues confirmed. With one pair of Speckled Woods, the female was very shy.
 

Speckled Woods
Common Blue
Small Heath
Wall Brown
Gatekeeper 100+ 
Meadow Brown 75+ 
Brown Argus 2+
Large White 6+ 
Red Admiral 3
Large Skipper 2
Small Skipper 4
Chalkhill Blue 5
Green-veined White 50+
Common Blue 50+ 
Peacock > 4
Speckled Wood 5
Small White 1
Holly Blue 1
Wall Brown 4 to 7
Small Heath 2+
 
  6-spotted Burnet Moth
  Silver Y Moth
Rush Veneer Moth

Lancing Ring Full Report (including the Full Butterfly Report)

28 July 2010
With three days before the peak emergence of Chalkhill Blue Butterflies on Mill Hill would be expected, the numbers are extremely poor with just 49 males recorded on the lower slopes transect on a cloudy day. After a small wait of two minutes, about 15 Chalkhill Blues were seen on the southern part of the Mill Hill Cutting. Then the sun came out from behind a cloud and they were all seen in flight at the same time. There was another Chalkhill Blue over the Old Erringham pasture as seen from the gate and at least two more males over the meadows on the top of Mill Hill. The first second brood male Adonis Blue was noted on the lower slopes, with five Wall Browns (two on the edge of the lower slopes) seen on the hill with very frequent Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns and four Small Heaths. Common Blue male butterflies were almost as frequent as the Chalkhill Blues on the lower slopes, and on the middle and upper slopes their numbers exceeded 200. Females of these three blue species were not noted*, but the cloudy and breezy conditions were well below optimum. The other blues around were a few Brown Argus on the middle slopes and meadows of Mill Hill, occasional Holly Blues mostly in town, and ten Small Blues still fluttering around on the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting. (* On reflection, there were probably some blue females.)
 

Brimstone Butterfly
Small Blue
Green-veined White

Large Whites were the most prevalent of the whites, but there were a few Small Whites on Mill Hill, and a pale Brimstone Butterfly on the lower slopes of Mill Hill.
There was huge Comma Butterfly in the hedgerow next to the southern bank of Buckingham Cutting and another on in the scrub on Mill Hill. Two Peacock Butterflies were quickly seen on the southern part of Mill Hill and one on the lower slopes and another one in the scrub. A handful of Red Admirals were seen on the outskirts of Shoreham. The wooded outskirts of Shoreham, the top part of Buckingham Park and the scrub of Mill Hill hosted occasional Speckled Woods.
A Carpet Moth (probably the Silver-ground Carpet, Xanthorhoe montanata) was seen on the hedgerow part of Mill Hill Cutting, south side, a Yellow Shell Moth was around the garden hedge at the top of the Pixie Path, Three Six-spotted Burnet Moths were all attracted to one Greater Knapweed flower, and Silver Y Moths were noted on Buckingham Cutting, south side, and the latter in the Mill Hill meadows.
A Green-veined White Butterfly was a notable definite photographed in the Waterworks Road, Old Shoreham.
Adur Moths
Seventeen butterfly species and four macro moths

Three additional species were recorded on my trip to Lancing Ring Nature Reserve. The list of 19 on the day is as follows:
 

Gatekeeper c80
Meadow Brown c35 
Brown Argus 2
Large White c20 
Red Admiral 5
Small Copper 4
Small Skipper 4
Small Blue 2
Comma 6
Common Blue c25 
Peacock 4
Brimstone 4 
Dark Green Fritillary 1
Holly Blue c15
Wall Brown 6
Ringlet 2
Small White c10
Speckled Wood 5
Chalkhill Blue 2
 

The new species were Chalkhill Blues, Small Blues and Brown Argus. The Dark Green Fritillary was a different specimen I am sure as this one had a chunk missing from the first rear wing.

Report by Mark Senior


26 July 2010
Gatekeepers and Large Whites were seen in Shoreham town with a Speckled Wood in the twitten between Corbyn Crescent and Adelaide Square.

25 July 2010
A clump of Marjoram on the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath between the first lay-by and Old Shoreham (going south) hosted a female Gatekeeper appreciably larger than her three male attendants and a Brown Argus, with a Meadow Brown visiting the clump occasionally. The photographs below show the relative sizes of each gender.
 

Marjoram
Gatekeeper (male)
Gatekeeper (female)

Large Whites fluttered by, a Green-veined White landed on a Fleabane, and at least one Red Admiral landed on the bone dry path.
Six species

24 July 2010
At least two Holly Blues and a few Small Whites, not seen the previous day, were seen around the Buddleia on the Adur Riverbank by the houseboats where the most frequent butterfly were Red Admirals with a few Gatekeepers and Large Whites
fluttered around in the humid sunshine. This is a first flower stop for immigrant Red Admirals.
Five species

23 July 2010
On a cloudy day, the meadow north of the upper car park on Mill Hill exploded in blue butterflies with ten male Common Blues in a square metre on about fifteen occasions and more blues and other butterflies over the rest of the meadows on Mill Hill giving total numbers seen in excess of 400. All were males and no females were spotted. Many more were hidden on a cool day.
The Chalkhill Blues on the lower slopes were not flying unless disturbed so only fifteen were seen on the transect.
Full Mill Hill Report
Adur Moths
 

Comma 1
Large White 10+
Meadow Brown 40+
Gatekeeper 40+
Red Admiral 2
Green-veined White 1
Speckled Wood 1
Common Blue 400+
Ringlet 1
Brown Argus 9+
Peacock 2
Chalkhill Blue 16
Brimstone 1
Marbled White 3
 Wall Brown 1
 
Small Purple-barred Moth 1
Silver Y Moth 2+
Six-spotted Burnet Moth 12+

There was a Red Admiral, Gatekeepers, Meadow Browns, and a Common Blue on the Pixie Path. It was decidedly cool when I visited the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting, so there was only one very small butterfly to be seen which turned to be a Brown Argus. There was a Ringlet seen on the southern meadow of the Slonk Hill Cutting.

Fifteen butterfly species and three moths, plus a micro-moth

21 July 2010
A cycle ride along the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath from Old Shoreham to the Cement Works registered frequent Meadow Browns, Large Whites and Gatekeepers with occasional Red Admirals, a few Commas and at least one Common Blue and a Peacock.
Seven species

20 July 2010
I approached Mill Hill from the south-west, with the first butterflies appearing in the Waterworks Road, Old Shoreham: a Comma, Large White and a Meadow Brown, with a Gatekeeper in the nearby Butterfly Copse.
My first Hummingbird Hawk-moth, Macroglossum stellatarum, of the year hovered/flitted around a clump of Greater Knapweed  in the north-west corner of Frampton's Field, Old Shoreham, as seen from the Pixie Path. The moth stayed around for a few minutes and it never seemed to keep in one place long enough for a photograph, although my observation was disturbed by a passing couple and their dog at an inopportune moment. The Pixie Path also hosted five Red Admirals, at least six Gatekeepers, at least eight Meadow Browns, at least five Large Whites, one Small White, one faded Small Skipper, the first male Common Blue of the day and a Holly Blue around the garden hedge at the top.
Adur Moths

By the time I reached Mill Hill I had already stopped counting the frequent Meadow Browns and Gatekeepers. The meadows south of the Reservoir were full of flowering Greater Knapweed and Lady's Bedstraw, and immediately the first of frequent Common Blues, a clear Brown Argus, a Small Skipper, a few Gatekeepers and a Meadow Brown were seen.
The southern steps down held a few Gatekeepers, a Meadow Brown, one Peacock Butterfly, one Red Admiral, a Large White and the first of the Silver Y Moths fluttering through the vegetation during the middle of the day.
 

On the lower slopes of Mill Hill, the count of male Chalkhill Blues were still a mere seventeen. Although it is over a week to the peak period, it still looks like it will be another poor year for this downland butterfly. Common Blues were not counted but there were almost as many males of these on the lower slopes. Meadow Browns and Gatekeepers were frequently seen but not especially numerous, with one Small Heath Butterfly spotted in the sticky humid weather. There was at least one Large White but only one Marbled White on the lower slopes. The first of frequent Six-spotted Burnet Moths flew around with most on the top of the hill.
As a trekked up from the scrub and middle slopes I noted more Gatekeepers, Meadow Browns, one Peacock Butterfly, one Red Admiral, and one Speckled Wood. A patch of Marjoram on the middle slopes was attractive to butterflies. The top meadow (north of upper car park) was noted for an explosion of male Common Blues with twenty of these bright blue butterflies all appearing at once with a Marbled White and more Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns. There were two more Red Admirals and occasional Gatekeepers near the large clumps of Creeping Thistle in the disturbed ground next to the cattle trough near the Reservoir.
Abridged Mill Hill Report
Fifteen butterflies and three macro-moths
 

Comma
Large White
Meadow Brown
Gatekeeper
Red Admiral
Small White
Small Skipper
Common Blue
Holly Blue
Brown Argus
Peacock
Chalkhill Blue
Small Heath
Marbled White
Speckled Wood
 
Hummingbird Hawk-moth
Silver Y Moth
Six-spotted Burnet Moth

An astonishing 22 butterfly species were seen on the Lancing Ring meadows over two days as follows:
 

Gatekeeper 
Meadow Brown 
Marbled White 
Large White
Red Admiral 
Peacock 
Small Copper 
Small Skipper
Essex Skipper
Comma 
Common Blue 
Holly Blue 
Small Tortoiseshell 
Brimstone 
Small Heath 
Green-veined White 
Wall Brown
 Dark Green Fritillary
Ringlet
Small White
Speckled Wood
Painted Lady
 
 

One small patch of Bramble was unusually attractive to butterflies today with no less than 13 species attracted to it in a 15 minute watch. This included a Dark Green Fritillary which gave me some very good close views and five Common Blues.

Report by Mark Senior on Sussex Butterfly Reports


This is the first positive record of a Dark Green Fritillary on Lancing Ring on these Nature Notes pages.

19 July 2010
It was on a small grass verge next to the A27 dual carriageway in north Lancing (opposite of Lancing Manor) that I spotted my first Small Copper Butterfly of the year. There was Gatekeeper and a Red Admiral in the vicinity. Large Whites were frequently seen everywhere from around the Sea Kale on Shoreham Beach to the roads of gardens of Lancing as I cycled along. There were a few large orange-brown vanessids over the shingle plants of Shoreham and Lancing beaches, but they fluttered or were blown too rapidly for precise identification, except for one which I thought was a Comma. A single Marbled White flew over Lancing town. Three Six-spotted Burnet Moths were feeding on a single Teasel plant by the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath south of the Toll Bridge. Amongst the large clump of Yarrow on the towpath next to the high wire fence to the disused Riverside Industrial Estate, there were a couple of Meadow Browns and an active mating pair of Small Skippers, out of the three seen.
A pristine Red Admiral settled on the wall next to the steps up to Shoreham Library just before 7:00 pm.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Eight butterfly species and one moth

I spent a couple of hours on the Lancing Ring meadows and recorded 19 species as follows:
 

Gatekeeper 200+
Meadow Brown 60 +
Marbled White 8
Large White 20
Red Admiral 8
Peacock 10
Ringlet 6
Small Copper 3
Small Skipper
> 15
Essex Skipper
Comma 4
Common Blue 7
Holly Blue 4
Small White 8
Small Tortoiseshell 1
Brimstone 1
Small Heath 2
Green-veined White 1
Wall Brown 1
   

The six Ringlet were a scarce recording from Lancing Ring.

Report by Mark Senior on UK Butterflies

18 July 2010
A slight break in the poor weather and there were plenty of flying insects around Shoreham, on the open southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting, I noted the butterflies in the order that they appeared: one Large White, frequent Six-spotted Burnet Moths, two male Common Blues, one Meadow Brown, two Small Blues, one Ringlet, two Gatekeepers and a Small White, all settled enough for positive and clear identification. In the immediate hedgerow as the path leads east, a Southern Hawker (dragonfly) had scared the butterflies into hiding but after it flew off three Speckled Woods and a Comma Butterfly appeared with another Meadow Brown. In the linear wood a pristine Red Admiral showed, Speckled Woods were frequently seen, with two more Large Whites and two more Small Whites.
 
Speckled Wood
Common Blue (male)
Gatekeeper (male)

On the open meadowy banks of the southern part of the Slonk Hill Cutting, there a few more Six-spotted Burnet Moths, a dozen Meadow Browns, two Ringlets, and two Large Whites.
 

Meadow Brown (female)
Meadow Brown (male)

In Park Lane Southwick and in St. Julian's Lane, Kingston Buci, there was a Comma Butterfly on the border vegetation in each road as I cycled past.
Ten butterfly species and one moth

17 July 2010
A Comma Butterfly visited my overgrown garden in Corbyn Crescent in residential Shoreham.

14 July 2010
An overcast day greeted with spots of rain as I met Eunice Kenward and two students surveying two areas of cleared land on the lower slopes of  Mill Hill for the ecological succession of plants. The conditions were not inimical to butterflies which were not the purpose of the visit. I did disturb eight male Chalkhill Blues and six Marbled Whites on half of the transect, with a Meadow Brown and two Gatekeepers.
 

Six-spotted Burnet Moths were frequently seen visiting Stemless Thistles which were frequently seen in flower as well as visiting other purple flowers including Hardheads, Greater Knapweed and Musk Thistle. The small pyralid moth Pyrausta nigrata was frequently seen and very noticeable.
Four butterfly species

11 July 2010
On the approaches to Mill Hill from the south-west, I noted a Brimstone Butterfly, one Comma, a Red Admiral, four Meadow Browns, three Gatekeepers, a Small Skipper and a Marbled White.
On the transect 1.2 acres of the lower slopes of Mill Hill, I recorded three Chalkhill Blues, frequent Gatekeepers (36+) occasional Meadow Browns (6+), frequent 6-spotted Burnet Moths (18+), frequent pyralid moths Pyrausta nigrata, four Marbled Whites, one Large White, three Small Skippers, two Small Heaths and one Peacock Butterfly.
 

Chalkhill Blue (male)
Chalkhill Blue (male)

North of the top car park the first second brood Common Blue Butterflies appeared with four fresh males seen amongst in the long grass and herb meadow. On the rest of Mill Hill I recorded about eleven Meadow Browns, at least seven Gatekeepers, five Marbled Whites, at least two Small Skippers and at least five Silver Y Moths. Amongst the scrub I also spotted one Comma, one Red Admiral, one Ringlet and two Speckled Woods.
Fourteen butterfly species and two macro-moths

10 July 2010
Southwater is on clay just about on the head waters of the western River Adur, and really outside the remit of this web page. However, Southwater Woods is famous for the Purple Emperor, Apatura iris, so in the warm of the north Sussex sunshine we visited this private wood. The idea is that you look up into the canopy of the Oak Trees to see of you spot this "mysterious" butterfly through your binoculars. Before, I got my binoculars out I spotted a very large brownish butterfly underneath an Oak leaf high in a large "Master" tree. The underside of this butterfly is brownish, but so was it the White Admiral or a Purple Emperor?. It was the only possible sighting during the day. It would have been good to see one but it was not on my list of "musts" so I thought I would enjoy the wood which I had not been to before.
Purple Empire
 

White Admiral
Silver-washed Fritillary

Silver-washed Fritillaries (30+) were frequently seen, always on the move, but eventually I found one that landed on a Bramble flower. White Admirals (15+) were frequent as well most of them flying beneath the canopy but one or two descending to ground level, but there were not many nectar plants on the woodland rides. Other butterflies in the wood were frequent Speckled Woods (12+), frequent Meadow Browns, occasional Ringlets, occasional both Small Skippers and Large Skippers, a few each of Green-veined Whites, Large Whites and Gatekeepers.
Later in the afternoon, by the River Adur at Shermanbury a Marbled White was added to the list of butterflies seen during the day.
Eleven species

The elusive White-letter Hairstreaks were discovered in Kingston Lane, Shoreham. Opposite the southern entrance to Shoreham Academy (formerly Kings Manor School) there is a long line of Elms on the east side of Kingston Lane (TQ 237 056). In the morning we saw two at the northern end of these Elms at about 10:00 am and then another about half way along. They spent the whole time flitting round the canopy though I did see one settled through binoculars. These are the first records of this butterfly on these web pages. Also a Small Tortoiseshell and then a first of the year Clouded Yellow in Phoenix Way, Southwick.

Report by Paul & Bridget James on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Butterfly Flight Times
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

9 July 2010
A quick detour from the top of The Drive, Shoreham to the southern bank of Buckingham Cutting produced the first Ringlet Butterfly for this area, followed by one Marbled White, one Small Blue, two Speckled Woods and one Green-veined White. Then I cycled the rest of the linear wood to the east with detours to the southern bank of the Slonk Hill Cutting at the two easiest access points and saw about forty Ringlet Butterflies; an unprecedented number and they were everywhere outnumbering all the other species added together, and they were restless with not a single one settling. Other species included occasional Gatekeepers, a few Meadow Browns in the most easterly Spotted Orchid meadow with a Marbled White, at least one Small Skipper and a few 6-spotted Burnet Moths.
 
Small Blue on Kidney Vetch Ringlet

In the late afternoon, I cycled to Annington Sewer along the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath and there were frequent Meadow Browns, occasional Marbled Whites, Gatekeepers, Large Whites, Small Tortoiseshells, Comma, Large Skippers (5+), Small Skippers and one Peacock seen. High over the canopy of trees near Annington Sewer, a small unidentified dark moth or butterfly flew clearly in the late afternoon. I wondered if this could have been a Purple Hairstreak not recorded before on these Nature Notes pages?
Thirteen definite butterfly species and one possible

8 July 2010
In the morning, two Comma Butterflies, frequent Meadow Browns, including mating pairs, three possible Wall Browns, one Gatekeeper, frequent Large Whites and at least two Small Tortoiseshell, and an unidentified skipper, were all seen along the towpath on a visit to the Streamside Hut (Farrows Barn) near Ladywell's Stream on the Coombes Road where a Red Admiral was spotted.
 

Comma
Small Skipper
Red Admiral
Marbled White

In the afternoon, a trip to Lancing Clump recorded four more Comma Butterflies, frequent Meadow Browns, a Small White, one Green-veined White, at least one Gatekeeper, occasional Marbled Whites, occasional 6-spotted Burnet Moths, and on McIntyre's field there were frequent Small Skippers.
On the Lancing Clump meadows, well over a hundred butterflies fluttered about; I added very frequent Marbled Whites, very frequent Meadow Browns, very frequent Small Skippers, a few definite Large Skippers, frequent Red Admirals, a definite pristine Wall Brown, more 6-spotted Burnet Moths, at least one Peacock Butterfly around the flowering Hemp Agrimony, and just the single Holly Blue. In the open in the north-west of the Nature Reserve there was at least one Small Heath Butterfly.
In the wooded area there were two very worn Speckled Woods. There were also two possible sightings of Ringlet Butterflies, one in the shrubbery next  to the bridlepath, and another one around the Hemp Agrimony. If I was able to confirm these restless butterflies, they would be my first record from Lancing.
Sixteen butterfly species plus one possible, and one macro-moth

5 July 2010
The first Chalkhill Blue Butterfly of the year was recorded at 11.06 am on the lower slopes of Mill Hill. On a bright humid day, Small Heath Butterflies were the most numerous on the lower slopes with nine counted. However, over the whole of Mill Hill, Marbled Whites were the most frequent with at least 36 counted, seven from the lower slopes, one over the Old Erringham pasture viewed from the southern gate, twelve or more from the middle slopes, 14 from the top meadows, and at least two over the open plateau. The lower slopes hosted seven Gatekeepers, a Peacock Butterfly, a Yellow Shell Moth, all fluttering around the Brambles and frequent pyralid moths of Pyrausta despicata and Pyrausta nigrata over the open slopes amongst the common flowering Privet. Meadow Browns were represented by just one recorded on the lower slopes, 13 in a clearing amongst the scrub, and 16 more over the meadows and mixed habitats on the top of Mill Hill, totalling at least 30. One major surprise was my first records of at least three Ringlet Butterflies in the top meadows and two more in a clearing of the scrub. A Large Skipper remained still long enough to be photographed. At least three Large Whites fluttered languidly over Mill Hill. A Comma Butterfly was seen south of the Reservoir, another one amongst the scrub and a third one in the Copse at the top. A Speckled Wood was seen in the scrub and another two under the canopy of the high trees of the top Copse. Two more Gatekeepers were seen on Mill Hill.
 

Large Skipper
6-spotted Burnet Moth
Marbled White (female)

Over Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge of the A27 to Mill Hill) there were two more Meadow Browns and a surprise two Ringlet Butterflies in the location the latter had never been recorded before. The Ringlets settled high in the shrub canopy.
At the top of The Drive, north Shoreham, a definite Green-veined White was spotted followed by my first Red Admiral of the day. On the southern part of Buckingham Cutting, it took two minutes for the first of a few Small Blue Butterflies to flutter over the Kidney Vetch, a Small Skipper was seen on a Greater Knapweed flower, and there were three Meadow Browns and two 6-spotted Burnet Moths. A Small White fluttered over Buckingham Park and others were seen later in the day. Intermittently unidentified butterflies left the path in front of me, too quickly. I thought some of these were Gatekeepers and that one could have been a Wall Brown, but not until one landed in Frampton's Field, Old Shoreham, I could say that at least one of them was a Small Tortoiseshell. At least two Red Admirals and a Small Skipper were seen on the wasteland around Old Shoreham.
 

Chalkhill Blue 1 Marbled White 36+ Meadow Brown 33+ Peacock 1
Small Heath 9 Gatekeeper 9+ Ringlet 7 Small Blue 2+
Small Skipper 2 Large Skipper 1 Comma 3 Speckled Wood 3
Large White 3+ Small White 3+ Green-veined White 1 Small Tortoiseshell 1+
Red Admiral 3   6-spotted Burnet Moth 3 Yellow Shell Moth 1

Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Adur Skippers
Seventeen butterfly species (the most in a day this year) plus two macro-moths

4 July 2010
The first butterfly of a bright, humid and breezy day was a pristine Wall Brown that landed in the middle of the car boot sale in the pastures below and immediately to the west of Mill Hill. This one of three in about an hour, the other two were seen over the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath from the first lay-by on the Steyning Road to the Cement Works and back to Shoreham, where three Comma Butterflies were disturbed on a cycle road curtailed because of excessive bicycle traffic, A Small Skipper was seen on the meadows of the main road south of the Cement Works (opposite the first lay-by from Shoreham). On the cyclepath meadow-like verges south of the Cement Works, Ringlet Butterflies were frequently seen (15+) ahead of Meadow Browns (12+) but because of the traffic I did not stay around to add Gatekeepers to the list. A probable male Common Blue was seen in the distance. A very large and languid Large White Butterfly fluttered by and I was about to dismiss a large white moth with a similar languid flight in the same way before I decided to look more closely and discovered it to be a Swallow-tailed Moth, Ourapteryx sambucaria. At first I thought it was a falling leaf and this nocturnal moth may have fallen from its tree canopy to the meadow below. A Small White Butterfly was seen alongside the cyclepath in Shoreham.
 
Ringlet Butterfly
Swallow-tailed Moth
Comma Butterfly

In Ham Road, Shoreham, opposite (to the north of) the Hamm Skatepark, a good condition Red Admiral fluttered over the grass bank just before 1:00 pm.
Nine butterfly species and one macro-moth

3 July 2010
A Small Skipper stayed still enough for a photograph by the Steyning Road (footpath entrance) in Old Shoreham and a fresh Comma Butterfly fluttered along the Waterworks Road. Large Whites and Small Whites were seen on the outskirts of Shoreham.
Adur Skippers
Four species
 
Small Skipper
Cinnabar Moth

2 July 2010
It was breezy enough to sway the taller plants and although butterflies were frequent enough along the eastern towpath of the River Adur (between Old Shoreham and the Cement Works), they were very flighty and some were hard to distinguish to species. Three of the first Small Skippers of 2010 visited the clumps of Tufted Vetch and three strong flying Marbled Whites were seen amongst the long grasses. Gatekeeper Butterflies were seen frequently along the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath by the Cement Works at Upper Beeding where in the tall meadow verges of Hardheads and Melilot, a few Ringlet Butterflies were seen; both species for the first time this year. The same area hosted frequent Meadow Browns and one distinctive Cinnabar Moth that fluttered rapidly through the tall herbs making photography very difficult. At Old Shoreham, one Six-spotted Burnet Moth was seen to have recently emerged from its cocoon on a Yarrow on the Cyclepath south of the the old Toll Bridge. In Shoreham and the outskirts and few each of Small Whites and Large Whites were seen in passing.
Adur Burnet Moths
Adur Skippers
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Seven butterfly species and two macro-moths

1 July 2010
A few Large White Butterflies fluttered amongst the Sea Kale on Shoreham Beach, and a Marbled White Butterfly flew over the long grass near the Old Fort. A Small Tortoiseshell rose from the towpath adjacent to the airfield and another one landed on the bare wooden flooring on the old Toll Bridge. About half a dozen Six-spotted Burnet Moths flew on both sides of the River Adur.
Three butterfly species and one macro-moth

27 June 2010
On a warm humid (>22 °C) day, butterflies and day-flying moths recorded were 13 Small Heath Butterflies, up to nine (5 to 9) Marbled Whites and at least two male Common Blues on the lower slopes of Mill Hill. The were frequent small moths including the pyralid Pyrausta purpuralis. A Brimstone Butterfly was seen flying over the Old Erringham pasture. The woody scrub and copse area added five Speckled Woods, the middle slopes, two more Marbled Whites and unidentified Burnet Moths. The top meadows hosted 11 Meadow Browns, at least four unidentified Burnet Moths, one Cinnabar Moth, more than four Silver Y Moths, a courting pair of two Large Skippers, a Small Heath Butterfly and at least one Burnet Companion Moth, all amongst the dried cow pats. The plateau and southern part of Mill Hill added another two Small Heath Butterflies, two Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies, another Meadow Brown and a few Silver Y Moths. The Pixie Path added a Small White, two Meadow Browns and a reddish Small Tortoiseshell. Two Large Whites and another Small Tortoiseshell were seen in Shoreham.
Nine butterfly species and four macro-moths

26 June 2010
 

Butterflies on a warm (>20.6 °C) day were a few bright Small Tortoiseshells and Meadow Browns on the towpath south of Cuckoo's Corner, plus at least one worn Red Admiral at Cuckoo's Corner and few Large Whites in the field to the north-west. This was on only a brief cycle ride to the outskirts.
Four species

25 June 2010
The first Narrow-bordered Five-spotted Burnet Moth of the year was spotted on a Creeping Thistle flower on the short path through the broken gate between the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath and the towpath on the bend of the River Adur. On a hurried ride down the cyclepath, I recorded at least one Speckled Wood Butterfly, one tattered and faded Red Admiral, a few each of Large Whites, Green-veined Whites,  Meadow Browns and male Common Blues. A Speckled Wood flew over Ham Road by the Co-operative Supermarket in the built-up area of central Shoreham.
Adur Burnet Moths
Six butterfly species

22 June 2010
On a sunny midday at least one (three sightings but they have been the same one) Marbled White Butterfly fluttered energetically over the Spotted Orchid and Ox-eye Daisy meadow of the southern bank of the Slonk Hill Cutting, with at least one distant Meadow Brown. The linear copse on the southern side of the Slonk Hill Cutting hosted over a dozen Speckled Woods.  At least thirty, possibly many more, Small Blue Butterflies were scattered over the southern bank of the Buckingham Cutting amongst the Kidney Vetch, with at least on distant male Common Blue and a Holly Blue amongst the Brambles.
Six species

21 June 2010
Cycling back from Worthing and walking through the Lancing Ring meadows, the first two butterflies recorded were two strong flying  Small Tortoiseshells followed by two restless Large Skippers visiting Bramble flowers on the narrow path due north of Upper Boundstone Lane and the Cemetery. In the late afternoon a passage trip through the meadows was unproductive with just three Meadow Browns, two male Common Blues and a Speckled Wood near the main Copse.
From a distance McIntyre's Field (north of Lancing Manor and the eastern part of Lancing Ring Nature Reserve) was covered in the yellow of Bird's Foot Trefoil, and close-up hundreds of of small moths and butterflies could be disturbed in the long grass meadow. The numbers were exceptional and included frequent Common Blue Butterflies of both genders, frequent Burnet Companion Moths, numerous Common Carpet Moths, and at least a dozen moth species that had to remain unidentified because of lack of time and knowledge. The much larger Meadow Brown Butterflies were also frequently seen. Large Whites and Small Whites were seen over gardens in Lancing and Shoreham.
Seven butterfly species

18 June 2010
Almost immediately I parked by bicycle on the southern part of Mill Hill, two Small Heath Butterflies and my first Meadow Brown of the year put in an appearance. At least a dozen worn Common Blues were seen on the lower slopes included two females, plus at least five Small Heaths, three Meadow Browns, frequent brown pyralid moths including Pyrausta despicata, plus a few Pyrausta purpuralis. I returned by the shortest ridge route where a Speckled Wood fluttered in the Hawthorn tunnel.
 
Large Skipper Meadow Brown

On the return passage trip, the southern part of Mill Hill produced one male Common Blue, another three Meadow Browns and a surprise* Large Skipper visiting one of the first Greater Knapweed flowers amongst the Cocksfoot very near the road south of the Reservoir. (*A surprise only because it was an area of meadow not productive for butterflies.) Over the residential part of Shoreham, a few Large Whites and Small Whites were seen.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Seven species

14 June 2010
A handful of Holly Blue Butterflies were seen in Lancing with two Large Whites over the Sea Kale on Lancing Beach.

13 June 2010
I spotted a Dark Green Fritillary on my BMS transect walk at Upper Beeding in the morning. Also a pristine Painted Lady.
These two were both firsts of the year for the local Adur area.

Report by Jim Steedman on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

12 June 2010
An unidentified vanessid flew over the Continental Market in Brunswick Road, Shoreham, a Holly Blue Butterfly was seen in Mill Lane, Shoreham and a Large White over Shoreham town.

9 June 2010
A check on Mill Hill in the sunshine (>17.6 °C) showed the Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, receding rapidly on the lower slopes and the still frequent (35+) Adonis Blues of both genders were outnumbered by the very frequent (50+) Common Blues of both sexes, with courting couples and the visible males outnumbering the females by nearly two to one in both species. The Small Heath Butterfly was also frequently (30+) seen aligning itself at angle when it settled for fleeting moments. A yellow Brimstone Butterfly skirted the wayward hedgerow at the bottom (western edge) of Mill Hill Nature Reserve. Just one bright Small Tortoiseshell Butterfly was noticeable on a day when the butterflies were very restless. Small moths (but not the usual pyralids)* were frequently seen in the amongst the herbs and there were at least three Burnet Companions Moths and more than one Treble-bar Moth. The Hawthorn scrub added a Common Carpet Moth and the copse at the top hosted a Speckled Wood. In the meadow to the north of the upper car park, Common Blues flitted amongst the taller herbs and it was here that I spotted my first Large Skipper of the year. There were a handful of Silver Y Moths. The overgrown meadow to the west hosted three Speckled Woods, a Brimstone Butterfly, and a bright Wall Brown. The plateau added a male Adonis Blue and the southern meadows a few Common Blues and a Small Heath on a quick passage.  (*possibly the Light Brown Apple Moth)
 

Holly Blue Butterfly
Small Blue Butterfly
Silver Y Moth

Instead of cycling home, I detoured via the overgrown Pixie Path with one male Common Blue noted over Frampton's Field, and two Large Whites and another Speckled Wood on the Waterworks Road. I cycled north along the Steyning Road and joined the Coastal-Downs Link Cyclepath at the first lay-by where I recorded a worn but intact Peacock Butterfly, three Speckled Woods, two Large Whites and a Green-veined White. At the Dacre Gardens entrance to Anchor Bottom, I was too tired to take more than a cursory look around to see my only Small Blue of the day, four Common Blues, one male Adonis Blue, a Small Heath, and at least two Burnet Companion Moths. There was a Small White over Dolphin Road, Shoreham.
Adur Moths
Adur Skippers
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

Twelve butterfly species and four macro-moths

8 June 2010
In the late afternoon, 5:45 pm, about fifty Small Blue Butterflies were immediately seen in an area of five square metres in two minutes amongst the long grasses and Brambles on the southern bank of Buckingham Cutting. About a dozen Kidney Vetch were seen in flower for the first time this year with Greater Bird's Foot Trefoil hosting a small Burnet Moth caterpillar. My first Cinnabar Moth of the year flitted amongst the grasses and herbs.
 

Small Blue Butterfly
Small Blue Butterflies
Small Blue Butterfly

Other butterflies during the overcast day were frequent Holly Blues around town, occasional Small Whites and a Red Admiral at the top of Buckingham Park.
Adur Moths
Adur Burnet Moths
Four butterfly species

6 June 2010
I joined an excellent tour of Mill Hill on Saturday morning led by Brianne Reeve of the Shoreham District Ornithological Society. Common Blues were everywhere and mating, also some Adonis Blues. A pair of Dingy Skippers were conducting an aerial courting display a few inches above the grass for over five minutes. A Wall, Brimstone and Speckled Wood were also seen.

Report by Colin Knight on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Small Blue Butterfly2 June 2010
Small White Butterflies and Holly Blues were both frequently seen around Shoreham town, plus about half a dozen Small Blue Butterflies on the southern part of Buckingham Cutting in the late afternoon.
 
Photograph by by Colin Knight
31 May 2010
On a cloudy but dry afternoon, I visited Mill Hill to see Wall Brown, Adonis Blues, Grizzled Skippers and Dingy Skippers.
 

Photograph Left: Female Adonis Blue by Colin Knight

30 May 2010
Adonis Blue (male)With the breeze (Force 3 gusting to Force 5) it felt too cool for butterflies, although the temperature was recorded at 18.8 °C at 1:00 pm when I visited Mill Hill. A few Holly Blues were seen around Shoreham town and more in the Hawthorn scrub on Mill Hill. The first butterfly to appear on the southern part of Mill Hill was a bright red Peacock, the only one of the day. On the transect 1.2 acres of the lower slopes the count in a timed 11 minutes was 122 male Adonis Blues and nine females, including a mating pair. This count extrapolates to about 350 Adonis Blues on Mill Hill. Later, I saw at least three more mating pairs. Identification needed at practised eye as there were frequent male Common Blues on the lower slopes estimated at about twenty. The identification was tricky on several occasions as some of the Adonis were past their best and the black markings on the wing fringe of the wings was almost absent. The Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, was also past its best and thousands of the flowers had already ceased. Other butterflies recorded on the lower slopes were occasional Small Heaths and one each of a Red Admiral, Brimstone, Green-veined White and Dingy Skipper.
 

Common Blue (male)
Adonis Blues
Purple Bar

My first Silver Y Moth of the year was seen by the Reservoir and another one the lower slopes where I saw at least one Burnet Companion Moth for the first time this year. The small pyralid moth Pyrausta nigrata was seen, but I did not spot any of the other pyralids. In the scrub there were one or two more male Adonis Blues, and my first Carpet Moth of the year. I have identified this carpet moth as the Purple Bar, Cosmorhoe ocellata. This is my first record of this common species.
It was getting quite breezy by the time I trekked over the middle slopes where the Horseshoe Vetch and Bird's Foot Trefoil was blooming in the Triangle area as a Red Admiral flew overhead. The first butterfly in the top meadow (north of the upper car park) was a Wall Brown followed by about twenty male Common Blues still in flight although the sky was overcast. A few more Adonis Blues were seen above the ridge. The return via an Alexander-strewnPixie Path was more of an obstacle course than a practical route with a few Holly Blues and another Red Admiral. A Small White Butterfly flew over the verges of Erringham Road, north Shoreham.
Eleven butterfly species and three macro moths
Adur Moths

26 May 2010
I spent a very enjoyable day out with Simon Barnes, David Bebber, BC Chief Executive Dr Martin Warren and Michael Blencowe. Simon is the award-winning sportswriter and wildlife columnist for The Times, as well as being an accomplished author. David is one of the UK's top media photographers, and I was left in awe at his proficiency with the camera - I couldn't even work out what he was up to most of the time, as he wielded his Canon with such consummate ease! Unsurprisingly, we were out doing an article on butterflies and conservation. After lunch we travelled to Mill Hill at Shoreham, where I was confident we would find some nice butterflies shivering in the grass. Sure enough, Adonis Blues and Common Blues, plus the odd Small Heath, Dingy Skipper and Grizzled Skipper were there to smile for the cameras. Simon's article will hopefully appear in The Sunday Times Magazine in a few weeks from now. It was a real pleasure to spend a day with such 'greats' - and by that I mean all of them.

Report by Neil Hulme on Sussex Butterfly Reports


24 May 2010
On another sunny day with a clear blue sky with an air temperature that was 18.4 °C in the shade at midday, I ventured up to the southern side of Buckingham Cutting where two first of the year Small Blue Butterflies appeared after a few minutes waiting. A Speckled Wood flew past me at the top of Buckingham Park, Shoreham. In and around town both Large Whites and Holly Blues were frequently seen with occasional Small Whites. The Waterworks Road hosted a male Orange Tip.

A comparison trip to Anchor Bottom, Upper Beeding (via Dacre Gardens) was interesting with two Small Heaths seen after a few minutes. The Adonis Blues appeared before I reached the Horseshoe Vetch slope. Again they were difficult to count but by a process of counting and estimating I came to a figure of thirty males in roughly a third of an acre patch (roughly the same density as on Mill Hill the day before). One mating pair was observed. Another eight Adonis Blues were scattered over the bottom of the pasture including the Stinging Nettle patch which also hosted a Wall Brown and a confirmed Green-veined White.  A Common Blue was confirmed with two more suspected. A bright Peacock Butterfly flew over the Black Poplar pasture to north-west of Botolphs and another male Orange-tip was seen by Annington Sewer. Another Wall Brown flew over the Downs-Coastal Link Cyclepath midway between Upper Beeding and Old Shoreham. There was another Common Blue visiting Red Clover on the southern spur part of the disused railway track that is now private land.
Twelve species
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

23 May 2010
The sun was out with a clear blue sky and the air temperature in the shade reached 18.3 °C at 1:00 pm when I trekked through the scrub after visiting the lower slopes of Mill Hill. With the sun coming out, so were the butterflies, with a Small White Butterfly around the Hamm Road Allotments (doubtless one of many) and my first Holly Blue of the day at the top of Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge to Mill Hill). As I parked my bicycle at the top of the steps at the southern end leading down to the lower slopes of Mill Hill, a couple of my first Small Heaths of the year danced over the short grass. Then a larger brownish-orange butterfly strongly over the Hawthorn before my eyes were adjusted. This was later surmised as a Wall Brown.
 

Small Heath
Orange-tip (female)
Small Heath
Adonis Blues

From the southern steps the Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, was visible but a few days away from its peak. Venturing down to the lower slopes, there were sufficient butterflies around that I immediately knew there would be a problem counting them unless I kept notes. Most of these were male Adonis Blues and I kept my count to the 1.2 transect area completed in 25 minutes. The transect tally recorded was exactly 100 males plus two females, including a mating pair. Later (after I had stopped counting) four mating pairs were seen. Extropolation of the count over the five acres of the lower slopes making allowances for lower numbers at the southern end, leads to me to make a conservative estimate of 300 Adonis Blues on Mill Hill, a larger number than recorded before.

Other butterflies recorded on the transect were 15 Dingy Skippers, 16 Common Blues, five more Small Heaths (all at the southern end), four Grizzled Skippers (Including in a courting pair mostly in the central overgrown area), a male Orange Tip, at least two Brimstone Butterflies, one unidentified white butterfly and a Treble-bar Moth. The small pyralid moth Pyrausta nigrata was frequently seen, but I did not spot any of the other pyralids. A Green Hairstreak was seen just outside the transect area with scores more AdonisBlues and at least half a dozen Dingy Skippers as I sat down north of the path.

In the scrub to the north-west a white butterfly was almost certainly a Green-veined White, plus a Holly Blue, with another white butterfly and five more male Adonis Blues amongst the Bulbous Buttercups in the the Old Erringham pasture. On the Triangle area of the middle slopes, the Horseshoe Vetch had now appeared, but the only butterfly was a Wall Brown in the north-east corner at the entrance to the Top Copse where this species is regularly seen. A Red Admiral flew over shortly afterwards. The Copse hosted a Speckled Wood. There were scant butterflies in the top meadow. I think I noted another Adonis Blue. Flying next to the scrub were a couple of Brimstones, one white female and a yellow male. On the gentle slope of the top part of Mill Hill, a Dingy Skipper visited a Horseshoe Vetch flower and there were a further half a dozen Adonis Blues, including another mating pair. A Large White Butterfly fluttered near the Reservoir.

The return route took me down the overgrown Pixie Path with nothing of note until a Red Admiral was seen near the Butterfly Copse next to the Waterworks Road. On the Waterworks Road, two Holly Blues were seen immediately followed by four white butterflies which turned out to be Orange-tips and then an orange-tipped male arrived. Three more Holly Blues were seen over the path  that runs along the south of Frampton's Field.
Fourteen butterfly species (most in a day)

21 May 2010
Large White Butterflies were frequently seen on Shoreham Beach and by Widewater.

18 May 2010
I went to Mill Hill in the late afternoon for a quick walk around and saw 5 Green Hairstreaks, my first ever in Sussex, also Wall Brown (1) Small Copper (1) Brimstone (3) Dingy Skipper, some egg laying (>20), Small White (1) , Burnet Companion Moth 3, Adonis Blues > 15 one mating pair with deformed wings of female. Perhaps this was due to very early mating on emergence the male was quite literally carrying her around. Mill Hill was alive with butterflies.

Report by Richard Roebuck on Sussex Butterfly Reports


Large White Butterflies were frequently seen around Shoreham and there was a Holly Blue and Small White seen as well.

16 May 2010
Eleven people attended the Butterfly Conservation Society walk on Mill Hill at Shoreham. Despite overcast skies and a strong, cool  wind, the butterflies performed well! Many stayed on after the official end to the walk, enjoying spells of quite warm, late afternoon sunshine - and some fabulous butterflies. Approximately 25 pristine Adonis Blues provided the 'star turn', including a mating pair. Several other chocolate-brown females were seen. Other species included Dingy Skipper (15), Grizzled Skipper (3), Common Blue (2), Green Hairstreak (1), Small Copper (1), Brown Argus (1), Small Heath (2) and Holly Blue(1). Thanks to all that showed a lot of faith in turning up on such a dreary Sunday afternoon, making it a very enjoyable event.

Report by Neil Hulme on Sussex Butterfly Reports
I did not attend as I thought the weather was too inclement.

15 May 2010
Small White Butterflies were frequently seen around Shoreham and there was an Orange-tip over Cuckoo's Corner.

14 May 2010
A male Orange-tip flying over the scrub at the top of The Drive in Shoreham was a surprise as it was not thought of prime habitat for this butterfly, but there were a few Garlic Mustard plants in flower. Other butterflies showing in this small area were a Large White, a Small White, two Speckled Woods and two Holly Blues. Encouraged by this and as the sun had begun to come out, I decided (against my original plans) to visit Mill Hill. On route, at the top of Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge to Mill Hill) another Large White and a Holly Blue fluttered amongst the small trees.
 

Common Blue (male)
Adonis Blue (female)
Brown Argus

It was after midday when a brown butterfly landed on the steps leading down to the lower slopes of Mill Hill from the southern end. It was not so quickly recognised as my first Wall Brown Butterfly of the year followed by another one almost immediately. I had walked almost halfway along the transect on the lower slopes before I spotted my first butterfly which settled on a Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, flower and immediately recognised as a chocolate-brown female Adonis Blue Butterfly. A Grizzled Skipper chased a male Adonis Blue, one of nine males seen in the half an hour I spent on the Shoreham Bank. There was enough Horseshoe Vetch for hundreds of butterflies but it did not stop my first Brown Argus (one of two) of the year landing on the same flower as another male Adonis. Two of the blue male butterflies looked smaller with a subtle different shade of blue. When one of these settled, they were identified as my first male Common Blue Butterflies of the year. Four Dingy Skippers flitted from flower to flower and leaves on the northern part of the lower slopes. The small pyralid moth Pyrausta nigrata was frequently seen, but I did not make a note of any other moth species.

Amongst the Hawthorn scrub in the north-west area of Mill Hill Nature Reserve  I encountered a settled Green-veined White and a Speckled Wood, with two more Speckled Woods in the copse at the top of the hill. The meadows are the top of Mill Hill looked rather forlorn and covered in dried cow pats with just a pair of courting Dingy Skippers dancing together amongst the Brambles that were straggling a route through the meadow.

The return route from Mill Hill down the Pixie Path with a detour to the Waterworks Road recorded five Large Whites, four Speckled Woods and two Holly Blues.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Brown Argus and Female Common Blue ID page
Twelve butterfly species (most in a day)

12 May 2010
After nearly week of overcast weather (and overnight air temperatures falling to 0.9 °C) a brief opening in the clouds encouraged me to make a trek to the lower slopes of Mill Hill to check out the Horseshoe Vetch, Hippocrepis comosa, and the butterflies (only small numbers were expected) (air temperature 9.2 °C) just before midday. The expanse of Horseshoe Vetch was only just beginning (the first flower was seen nine days late this year) and visited by 13 Dingy Skippers and my first four male Adonis Blues of the year.
 

There was also one yellow Brimstone Butterfly, an unidentified white butterfly and a good condition Peacock Butterfly on the bank. A Speckled Wood Butterfly appeared at the top of the Pixie Path and another one amongst the Alexandersstrangling the path that runs along the southern edge of Frampton's Field.
Five Identified Species

10 May 2010
A spell of inclement weather has curtailed the butterfly reports, but A Small White was seen in Fishersgate and a Holly Blue in West Street, Shoreham.

6 May 2010
It was a pleasant sunny day (> 14.9  °C) for the elections and returning in the morning via Rosslyn Road, Shoreham to visit the dentist, I spotted a Small White, Holly Blue and Speckled Wood Butterfly in quick succession. Encouraged by these spring sightings, I detoured to the Waterworks Road in the early afternoon, where a tattered Peacock Butterfly and three male Orange-tips were seen immediately on my passage trip, followed by two smaller than normal Specked Woods on the path to the nearby Butterfly Copse, and another one at the top of the Pixie Path , with a good condition Red Admiral basking at the top of Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge to Mill Hill).
Six species

Not a bad day here in Shoreham; in the garden we spotted three Small Whites,one Holly Blue, one Speckled Wood, and one Peacock. Then off across the bridge to Mill Hill Nature Reserve on the lower slope I spent two hours, 2.30 to 4.30 pm. I saw my first Adonis Blue of the year, then I found three Green Hairstreaks, three Small Coppers, one Grizzled Skipper, two Orange Tips, one Speckled Wood, two Small Heaths, lots of Dingy Skippers, male and female Brimstones, and Small Whites.

Second Report by Alec Trusler on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

30 April 2010
The first butterfly of the year flew over my garden in Corbyn Crescent in Shoreham and then up and over the eaves of my roof. It flew strongly and I could not recognise the species: it could have been a Speckled Wood or any of the vanessids.

28 April 2010
A quick walk with the dog over Mill Hill, TQ 212072 and I spotted Peacocks, Speckled Woods, and my first Small Heath of the year.

Report by Alec Trusler on Sussex Butterfly Reports


27 April 2010
As the sun had come out, albeit briefly and weakly, I thought I would pay a quick visit to Mill Hill to examine the numbers of skippers and micro-moths on the lower slopes. On the 1.2 acre transect the 15 minute count was five Grizzled Skippers (including a courting pair) and six Dingy Skippers. Only one Peacock was seen with three Brimstone Butterflies and an unidentified white butterfly. Pyralid moths were common, and could be seen at all times on the lower slopes. They were the three usual species: Pyrausta nigrata (100+), a few Pyrausta purpuralis and a few Pyrausta despicata. Contrary to making my usual circular route through the scrub, I walked back along the lower slopes above the pathway. Almost immediately I spotted another Dingy Skipper and then four Peacocks and an Orange-tipfluttered past. I sat down to rest and spotted another three Brimstones skirting the wayward hedgerow below (west edge of Mill Hill Nature Reserve), before another Grizzled Skipper visited the Dog Violets beside me.
Shoreham town provided a Small White Butterfly and the top of Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge to Mill Hill) hosted a pair of Speckled Woods (seen twice) and a Large White. A vanessid flew over the Pixie Path and this was probably another Peacock. A good condition Comma Butterfly flew up into the trees by the Waterworks Road: and by this time the sun had been obscured by a cloud and the only other butterfly seen was a Speckled Wood. At the top of The Street, Old Shoreham, a Holly Blue Butterfly fluttered out of the trees and bushes separating the street from Frampton's Field.
Ten butterfly species (equal most in a day)

My first Small Heath of the year was seen on my Anchor Bottom transect and this was the first reported in Sussex. Also about eight Burnet Companion Moths, and a good supporting cast.

Report by Jim Steedman on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Adur Moths
 

26 April 2010
On an overcast day, a single Speckled Wood was the only butterfly seen on passage along the Pixie Path.

25 April 2010
I had Mill Hill to myself from 1:30 to 3:00 pm, amazing on a sunny Sunday afternoon. There was an abundance of Grizzled Skippers and Dingy Skippers and I witnessed fights among two and three individuals, and across species. I estimate I saw ten of each species plus four Peacocks and an Orange tip.

Report on Colin Knight on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Skippers
23 April 2010
Far from a glut of butterflies, the urban areas had none seen at all, but on the outskirts of town in the early afternoon sun a steady stream appeared on the Waterworks Road: occasional Green-veined Whites and Peacocks, one Holly Blue, one Speckled Wood, one or two yellow Brimstones and a few male Orange-tips. The Pixie Path just added a few Peacocks, but the top of Chanctonbury Drive (SE of the bridge to Mill Hill) hosted an intact Red Admiral, a pair of Speckled Woods, and at least one female  Small White and a few Large White butterflies.
 
Horseshoe Vetch
Pyrausta nigrata
Green-veined White

I had no plans to visit Mill Hill, but I decided to venture down to the lower slopes, which were alive with scores of pyralid micro-moths of the three usual species: Pyrausta nigrata (50+), Pyrausta purpuralis (8+) and a few Pyrausta despicata. These were the ones actually seen and there were many more. The usual transect route hosted a few Peacocks and a few Brimstones but failed to reveal any skippers, but I decided up the steep slopes where one Grizzled Skipper landed on a Dandelion next to me.
Ten species (most in a day)

21 April 2010
A yellow Brimstone Butterfly flying past St. Nicolas Church, Old Shoreham, was the first of the day, in the sunshine, when I had appointments that preventing me visiting the downs. I spent about ten minutes at the nearby Waterworks Roadwhich immediately hosted my second male Orange-tip of the year, followed by three of the inevitable Peacocks, one of them now looking more than a little worn, my first Green-veined White Butterfly flying strongly over the Maple Spinney but visiting a ground level Dandelion for positive identification, with a Speckled Wood or two, another yellow Brimstone and three Comma Butterflies. The Butterfly Copse (named for the stepped part of the footpath that used to be a shaded by Ivy and Buddleia) attracted at least one more Peacock and a Small Tortoiseshell. A Small White fluttered over the grassy riverbank by the Adur Riverbank Industrial Estate (north of Ropetackle) and my first Holly Blue was seen over a garden hedge at the top (north-east) end of Buckingham Road, Shoreham.
Nine species (equal most in a day) without visiting the downs

My first ever sighting of a Dingy Skipper, well actually four, and six Grizzled Skippers at Mill Hill (Grid ref: TQ 210 072).

Report by Richard Roebuck on Sussex Butterfly Reports


In my garden at Mill Hill we saw one Small Tortoiseshell, one male Orange Tip (my first of the year) and one flighty Holly Blue. I went over the bridge in the afternoon to the lower slopes of Mill Hill Nature Reserve to find one male Brimstone also one female Brimstone there was lots of Peacocks flying about, one Speckled Wood, five Grizzled Skippers and four Dingy Skippers that included a mating pair.

Report by Alec Trusler on Sussex Butterfly Reports
19 April 2010
 

Just a single male Orange-tip Butterfly (the first of the year) fluttered over the verge just north of where the Ladywells Stream flows under the Coombes Road, north of Cuckoo's Corner. Its food plant, Garlic Mustard was not yet flowering. The only other butterfly seen on the day was a Large White further south along the Coombes Road.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

18 April 2010
The Stinging Nettles which have appeared in profusion since the introduction of Cattleon Mill Hill during the winter months were the residency of two Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies. The transect area of just over an acre on the lower slopes produced just the six Grizzled Skippers, one Dingy Skipper, occasional Peacock Butterflies, a few Brimstone Butterflies and frequent pyralidmicro-moths of the three usual species: Pyrausta purpuralis (40+), Pyrausta despicata (a few) and Pyrausta nigrata (10+). There may have been considerably larger numbers of these small moths. Pyrausta purpuralis was in unprecedented profusion.
 


The north-west Hawthorn scrub area of Mill Hill Nature Reserve hosted at least three Speckled Woods and some more Brimstones and Peacocks, and the copse at the top was the abode of a Red Admiral. The Trianglearea of the middle slopes had been cleared of the new Dogwood that threatened to overwhelm the clearing, and without looking for any butterflies another Grizzled Skipper appeared and another one was seen just north of the Reservoir on the ridge of the lower slopes.
There was a third party descriptive report by a couple of birdwatchers of what could only be a mating pair of Small Copper Butterflies, the first record this year. (This has not been recorded as the first record.)
The Pixie Path added a Comma and there was another in the Waterworks Road with two Small Whites and more Brimstones and Peacocks.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Mill Hill Report
Personal butterfly species tally of nine (the most so far this year) species, plus one Report

Two Green-veined White Butterflies were spotted (the first of the year) in the north-west corner of Lancing Ring Nature Reserve, outside of the clump of trees.

Lancing Report by Ray Hamblett
Friends of Lancing Ring web pages

17 April 2010
A simple detour to the Waterworks Road for a comparison was interesting because both Small Whites and Large Whites were present in small numbers (two and three) and occasionally they settled on the common Dandelions and the differences between the species and between the genders could be discerned. The size differences were clear. Two yellow Brimstone Butterflies sparred with the Large Whites.
 

Small White (male)
Large White (female)
Large White (male)

Activities of both Wrens and Blue Tits were very evident and I surmised that these were parents birds with young, and the half a dozen or so Peacock Butterflies occasionally had large bits out of their wings. One or two Comma Butterflies settled.
Five species

Eight species were seen at Mill Hill: Peacock, Comma, Small Tortoiseshell, Brimstone (female), Large White, Speckled Wood, Dingy Skipper and an amorous pair of Grizzled Skippers.

Report by John Williams on Sussex Butterfly Reports

15 April 2010
The Waterworks Road in Old Shoreham was bathed in weak sunshine, enough for the butterflies to be out: two Small Whites, one Small Tortoiseshell, two Peacocks, one Brimstone and two Comma Butterflies were seen on a passage visit, with another Comma in the Butterfly Copse.
 
Small Tortoiseshell
Brimstone
Dingy Skipper
Grizzled Skippers

At last I managed to see my first skippers of the year, although they would not easy to discover if it was not for the other butterfly spotters on Mill Hill. This was by dint of watching them photographing a Dingy Skipper, my first skipper, and then I spotted a fluttering Grizzled Skipper out of the corner of my eye before I was shown a mating pair on Bramble and then discovered another mating pair for myself. Only the lower slopes were visited and the other butterflies showing were a few Peacocks and a yellow Brimstone. I saw my first Pyrausta nigrata pyralid micro-moths, with two settled and others flitting about.
Two more Small Whites were spotted in Shoreham.
Adur Skippers
Six butterfly species

14 April 2010
What a difference a day makes, showing the fickle nature of butterfly appearances. A half an hour spent on the lower slopes of Mill Hill failed to locate any butterflies on a cool overcast day. In three visits I still have not spotted a Grizzled Skipper yet.

13 April 2010
The first Speckled Wood Butterfly of the year settled with its wings closed on a dead branch on the verges of the Waterworks Road, with frequent Peacock Butterflies, occasional Comma Butterflies, a few languid flying Large Whites and at least one yellow Brimstone Butterfly. The choice of nectar plant was Dandelion, common and easily the most prevalent plant on the verges at the southern end of the road.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Five species

My first Holly Blue Butterfly was seen in Lancing. It seemed to be defending an Eleagnus bush.

Holly Blue Report by Ray Hamblett on Sussex Butterfly Reports


Things are hotting up nicely now and Mill Hillmust have been one of the warmest places in the country today. Sheltered from the north-east wind the butterflies were very active. Estimates for Grizzled Skippers range from 10 to 15 including one mated pair and at least another courting pair. Mating lasted over an hour during which time they were watched and photographed by five Butterfly Conservation Sussex members. They are certainly fascinating to watch and interesting to see how a male will chase off other species even when sighted in the distance but not (too) bothered by us humans creeping up slowly. Also a Dingy Skipper (the first of the year in Sussex) with its wings still drying, matching the first date from last year at the same spot to within 10 metres, at the same time of day and by the same observer! Looks like the cold weather didn't affect this species at least. Peacockseverywhere, two Small Tortoiseshells, three Brimstones, two Small Whites and one Comma.

Mill Hill Report by Tom Ottley on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Adur Skippers

11 April 2010
The first Large White Butterfly of the year fluttered strongly along the Waterworks Road, with a few Peacock Butterflies at least one Comma. On the lower slopes of Mill Hill, there were half a dozen more Peacocks but the Grizzled Skippers were not seen, not even by the other four butterfly spotters. There were occasional pyralid micro-moths Pyrausta purpuralis.
Three butterfly species
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

A Grizzled Skipper was seen on the lower slopes of Mill Hill.

Skipper Reports, one each, by Caroline Clarke and Ellie Corrigan on Sussex Butterfly Reports


9 April 2010
Peacock Butterflies were frequently seen in the sunshine on the Adur Levels, about 16 in an hour including a pair photographed copulating on Spring Dyke, north of Old Shoreham.
 

Other butterfly species seen in two hours including two yellow Brimstone Butterflies (one over the Waterworks Road and another near Botolphs), a Small White over the shaded part of the path from Botolphs to the River Adur, and two worn orangey-brown Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies west of the South Downs Way Bridge.
Four species

8 April 2010
The butterfly spotters were out on Mill Hill in the sunny morning to find the first few Grizzled Skippers of the year. They found them, but I did not, even I stayed on the hill for the best part of an hour. Peacock Butterflies were frequently seen with about 16 on Mill Hill (the actual sightings were more, but some on the lower slopes may have been the same ones) and a few more on the approaches. They were very active and visited the abundant Sweet Violets, but they were also seen on the much lesser quantity of Dog Violets which were only just starting. A large white male Brimstone Butterfly was the first to be seen of at least four definites on the lower slopes, of each gender and another male in the Ivy amongst the Hawthorn scrub in the north-west of Mill Hill Nature Reserve,  A Red Admiral settled briefly under the copse at the top of the hill. On the ridge and the top of the lower slopes just north of the Reservoir, four good condition orangey Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies were seen divided into two pairs, and another one was seen over the road five minutes later. A few pyralid micro-moths were seen on the lower slopes with Pyrausta purpuralis definitely identified.
 

Peacock Butterfly on a Dandelion
Male Brimstone Butterfly
Red Admiral

A yellow Brimstone Butterfly and a Peacock Butterfly visited Dandelions on the verges of the Waterworks Road, Old Shoreham, with at least one Comma fluttering around.
A Small White Butterfly flew over the margins of Frampton's Field and the northern part of the Pixie Path and this was the first one seen this year. Later, another one was seen near Ladywells Stream north of Cuckoo's Corner.
Adur Butterflies: First Dates
Six species seen by me and one Report

Returning to Mill Hill with my father and Brian Henham, we saw three, possibly four Grizzled Skippers, seven Peacock Butterflies, four Brimstone Butterflies, two Small Tortoiseshell, one Comma, together with pyralid moths: one Pyrausta aurata, six Pyrausta purpuralis, three Pyrausta despicata  and two Pyrausta nigrata.

Report by Neil Hulme on Sussex Butterfly Reports
Adur Skippers
 
6 April 2010
My first Small Tortoiseshell Butterfly of 2010 fluttered over the wooden footway of the Toll Bridge, Old Shoreham, followed a few minutes later by a Peacock Butterfly and my first Comma at the entrance to the Maple Spinney (near the Waterworks Road), Old Shoreham. 
Adur Butterflies: First Dates

The firstGrizzled Skipperof the year was discovered on Mill Hill. Also present were six Peacock, one Brimstone and the diminutive pyralid moths: one Pyrausta aurata, four Pyrausta purpuralis and three Pyrausta despicata.

Skipper Report by Neil Hulme (verbal)

21 March 2010
At last I saw my first butterfly of the year: a Red Admiral flew around the bridge over the A27 to Mill Hill. It settled on the road for just one second. In the north-west Hawthorn scrub area of Mill Hill Nature Reserve, a bright yellow Brimstone Butterfly flew over from the lower slopes. An hour later in the middle of a day of weak sunshine, a Peacock Butterfly flew over Frampton's Field in Old Shoreham from the shelter of the Ivy bushes on the west border of the Pixie Path.

15 March 2010
I saw a female Brimstone Butterfly in the garden where I work near Shoreham today. I had to run round after it until it settled briefly on an Iris reticulata long enough for me to be sure it wasn't an early Cabbage White.

Report by Tessa Pawsey on Sussex Butterflies


24 February 2010
It was the first time this year that I have felt the warmth of the sun on my back. The air temperature reached 9.1 °C.
Shoreham Weather Page

A Red Admiral Butterfly was seen at the Sir Robert Woodard Academy, Boundstone Lane, Lancing.

Butterfly Report by Katherine Hamblett on Sussex Butterflies


A Red Admiral Butterfly was spotted in my front garden in Southwick in the afternoon.

Report by Paul James on SOS Recent Sightings


5 February 2010
One Red Admiral Butterfly was enjoying the afternoon sunshine in our Mill Hill garden in the afternoon.

Report by Dave Green on Sussex Butterflies


Butterfly & Large Moth List 2009
 
 
Butterfly Habitat Notes
 

Observations of the habitats of the Small Heath Butterfly

Observations of the habitats of the Small Copper Butterfly

Some Notes on the local Meadow Brown Butterfly populations

Notes on the Wall Brown Butterfly

Bird's Foot Trefoil & the Common Blue Butterfly

Some other notes on resident butterflies and moths in the Adur area (Part One)

Some other notes on resident butterflies and moths in the Adur area (Part Two)

Adonis Blues notes from the downs near Shoreham

Chalkhill Blues notes from the downs near Shoreham

Skippers of the downs near Shoreham

Observations of the other Butterflies of the Adur district area and a few absentees

Observations of some of the smaller Moths in the Adur district area

Etymology of the word "butterfly"
 

Lead Agencies for designated Local Nature Reserves
 

Clouded Yellow Butterfly  (Link to a recommended photograph by Dave Appleton)

 


Adur Butterfly Flight Times

Adur Butterflies 2008



 

Earliest Butterfly Sightings Summary
Sussex Butterflies
Butterfly Flight Times (best site)
Butterfly Conservation: First Sightings
UK Butterflies Discussion Board



 
 

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2004 Index pageMill Hill Wildlife Reports 2008 (Link)Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2009 web pagesLink to the Adur 2010 Nature Notes pages

Notes:At the current rate of decline, Chalkhill Blue Butterflies would disappear from Mill Hill in about 20 years


Adur Butterflies
Blue Butterflies of Shoreham



Prevalence Definitions (does not apply to birds):

NEW ACFOR SYSTEM OF ABUNDANCE OVER A SPECIFIED AREA:

SUPERABUNDANT = 10,000 +
ABUNDANT 1000- 10,000
VERY COMMON = 500-1000
COMMON 100-500
VERY FREQUENT = 50-100
FREQUENT 10 - 50
OCCASIONAL 2-10
RARE = ONLY 1  or

Scarce 4-10 per year
Very Scarce 1-3 per year
Rare   less one than every year
Very Rare   1-3 records in total since 2000

Condition of Butterflies
Pristine
Fine:  good condition
Average
Poor
Tattered;  Torn and battered



Adur Butterflies
 

MultiMap Aerial Photograph of the Adur Levels and the Downs

British Lepidoptera on flickr

UK Butterflies Sightings
 



SquinancywortLady's BedstrawVervainEyebrightWild BasilLink to the Adur 2010 Nature Notes pages
 
 JANUARY
 FEBRUARY
 MARCH
 APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
 SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
 NOVEMBER
 DECEMBER

 

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2009 web pages

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2008 web pages

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2007 web pages


Link to Adur Nature Notes 2005  Index page
Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2006 web pages


 
  -1>ABUNDANT 1000- 10,000
VERY COMMON = 500-1000
COMMON 100-500
VERY FREQUENT = 50-100
FREQUENT 10 - 50
OCCASIONAL 2-10
RARE = ONLY 1  or

Scarce 4-10 per year
Very Scarce 1-3 per year
Rare   less one than every year
Very Rare   1-3 records in total since 2000

Condition of Butterflies
Pristine
Fine:  good condition
Average
Poor
Tattered;  Torn and battered



Adur Butterflies
 

MultiMap Aerial Photograph of the Adur Levels and the Downs

British Lepidoptera on flickr

UK Butterflies Sightings
 



SquinancywortLady's BedstrawVervainEyebrightWild BasilLink to the Adur 2010 Nature Notes pages
 
 JANUARY
 FEBRUARY
 MARCH
 APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
 SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
 NOVEMBER
 DECEMBER

 

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2009 web pages

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2008 web pages

Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2007 web pages


Link to Adur Nature Notes 2005  Index page
Link to the Adur Nature Notes 2006 web pages