Organisms growing on Wood


I am a novice to the mosses, lichens etc, so I have avoided identification for the time being, because mistakes and misinformation could occur.
 
Epilithic = living on rocks.  The equivalents would be "epixylic" on wood, or "epidendric" on trees - both have lots of Google hits. Purists might also distinguish epicambic for "on bark" but Google gives no hits, so looks like I've just invented that one!
Comment by Malcolm Storey (BioImages) on the on UK Botany (Yahoo Group)

Saproxylic refers to an association with dead and dying wood.

18 March 2005
 
Lichen

Lichens (photographed above) on fallen fences next to the Pixie Footpath adjacent to the horse fields on the way to Mill Hill,

16 March 2005
 

Mosses and lichens (photographed above) on fallen fences next to the Pixie Footpath adjacent to the horse fields on the way to Mill Hill, proved difficult because of their small size and their apparent preference for the shade.
 

8 February 2005
A spell of sunshine around midday at sea level turned to mist on the gentle Pixie Footpath climb to Mill Hill. Not expecting much natural life, my attention was drawn to the growths on some broken fences that had been left to rot. The various unidentified mosses, lichens etc. are illustrated below.

Pixie Cups
 
The podentia of a Cladonia lichen 
The podentia of a Cladonia lichen

The fences were to the north at the top of the path as it passed by the large (three metres high plus) hedge on the southern side that formed the garden boundary. This means that they were partially in the shade.
 
 
The podentia of a Cladonia lichen
The podentia of a Cladonia lichen

Adur Lichens page

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