British Marine Life Study Society
(founded 1990)

GLAUCUS HOUSE 
14 CORBYN CRESCENT SHOREHAM-BY-SEA  SUSSEX : BN43 6PQ

TEL/FAX: 01273 465433

EMail Glaucus@hotmail.com

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Andy Horton spends a year examining the biology and behaviour of the rock pool fish and other marine life.
 


 
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Sea Horse
Hermit Crabs
Information file for children


 
 What is it? 
Brief guide for Parents
Devon WWT
Popular Guides
Rockpooler's Itinerary
Shrimps and Prawns
Notes for Teachers
British Whales & Dolphins
British Seals
Hermit Crabs
Shorewatch Project

 

 

British Marine Life 
Study Society

NOTES FOR THE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER


Safety is the overriding concern when taking primary school children down to a rocky shore, or a rock and sand shore, for an exploration. It is easy to have an accident on slippery rocks, and barnacles can raise a nasty graze. 

Every child should have at least a knowledge of the common animals found between the tides, e.g. winkles, limpets, mussels, cockles, hermit crabs, starfish, crabs, sea urchins etc. (it should be remembered that the common names in Scotland are sometimes different). The article "What is it?" may help the parent and teacher.
The expedition can also be used to explain the working of the tides, types of shore, how far is the horizon? etc. 

One idea that you will find in books is to encourage the children to collect a few dead seashells washed up on the strandline. The idea not in the books is to arrange the dry shells on the school (or home) flatbed scanner. If you collect two of each shell (or both halves of a bivalve), both sides can come out on the final image. We would be interested in seeing the final scan, with full details of the shore from where the shells were collected (including the grid reference if possible). 
Please send it to the above EMail address.
Try to identify the shells from a popular guide.
 

  Seashells scanned in 

We are also interested in photographs showing the topography of each shore (if you go down the day before, or after, you can take a photograph at high tide as well).

Zonation on the shore may be too much for all but the brightest pupil to take in, but the bands of different seaweeds, limpets on rocks etc, can also make a good photograph even with a basic snapshot camera. Shingle plants are also easy to photograph. 

Wembury Bay, Devon (Photograph by Bryan Vallance, Plymouth)


What is it? 
Brief guide for Parents

TRY THIS BOOK!

"It has often been said that more people go fishing than watch football matches. But for every well-equipped adult angler, round the corner are a dozen muddy little tiddler-catchers. 
There can only be one possible conclusion.
TIDDLER-CATCHING IS THE MOST POPULAR SPORT IN THE WORLD."
from  "HOW TO CATCH TIDDLERS"
by Ian Russell


ISBN  0-14-031891-7

  • The Devon Wildlife Trust produce an information pack for teachers.  Tel:  01392 279244  Jenny Glanvill or Emma Davis. 

The BMLSS (England) site commenced on 1 January 1997
Andy Horton
Shoreham-by-Sea
EMail

Andy Horton, Webmaster

       Copyright 1999   British Marine Life Study Society

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